The Center for Education & Training

Events and Workshops

The Ecumenical Center collaborates with many organizations to provide quality, educational workshops designed to strengthen the community’s care providers. Our Speakers Series is generously underwritten by Methodist Healthcare Ministries.

Presented by The Ecumenical Center counselors and staff.

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Open Art Studio Session. A wonderful opportunity for people of all ages (6-106) to use art materials in a playful manner in a relaxed setting.

To reserve a seat, please email Vlwpatrbc@gmail.com or call Lejla Cenanovic at The Center (210) 616-0885.

Every Fourth Saturday:

10:00am-1:00pm

with Vicki Williams Patterson at The Ecumenical Center

by Katherine Shear at The Ecumenical Center

Sex addiction is a real issue which impacts millions of relationships, individuals, marriages and families in ur own communities. The negative impact is felt in the life of the addict and his or her surrounding family members and friends. There are many that understand that a sexual addiction might be at play, few recognize that all sex addictions are not the same. The reality is that there are six different types of sex addicts, learning how to identify each of the six types of sex addiction will help find the path to recovery that is right for the addict.

In addition, one result of addiction is betrayal trauma for the Partner in the relationship, broken trust from the betrayal runs deep. There is a need for healing, validation and empathy to recover from this unique partner betrayal.

Dr. Doug Weiss, offers practical help to identify and treat sexual addiction and will walk you through the six different types of sex addiction, how to identify and understand the impact each can have on an addict. Dr. Weiss will also discuss Partner Betrayal Trauma and what betrayal trauma looks like, how the pain and experience of betrayal affects the Partner, and steps they can take to become stronger and recover in the relationship.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to identify the 6 types of sexual addiction.
  • Participants will be able to assess and design a treatment plan for the 6 types of sexual addiction.
  • Participants will be able to identify Partner Betrayal Trauma.
  • Participants will be able to assess and design a treatment plan for Partner Betrayal Trauma.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Doug Weiss is a Licensed Psychologist and the Executive Director of Heart to Heart Counseling Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado. As Director, Dr. Weiss maintains a number of counselors, support groups, 3 and 5 day intensive workshops. Dr. Weiss is also President of the American Association for Sex Addiction Therapy (AASAT). Dr. Weiss is a frequent guest on national television, radio and print media, and prolific writer on marriage, addiction and self-help topics pertaining to intimacy in marriage, singlehood, men’s and women’s issues and recovery from addiction. He is an international conference speaker on healthy marriages, and men’s recovery.

at The Ecumenical Center

Keynote Speaker: Diane Meier, MD, FACP

 

Palliative care focuses on enhancing quality of life — through relief of symptoms, pain and stress — for those experiencing one or more serious chronic illness, and it also ensure that families and other caregivers get the support they need. This is increasingly important as more people are living years, or even decades, with serious illnesses.

THIS EVENT HAS SOLD OUT IN THE MAIN LECTURE HALL. DUE TO POPULAR DEMAND WE HAVE OPENED UP REGISTRATION FOR A LIVESTREAM IN THE ADJACENT TEA ROOM THE CENTER 

The Rest Of The Story: What They Did Not Teach You in Graduate School

A Review of Ethics, Rules and Best Practices for the Mental Health Professional

This program will provide an overview and discussion of state and federal laws, rules and regulations that govern the practice of a mental health professional. The presentation will discuss Texas confidentiality statutes, the privacy regulations under the federal Health Insurance Privacy and Portability Act (HIPAA) and recent amendments to Texas Family Code, Chapter 107 regarding child custody evaluations in family law cases and how to testify in court. The program will review recent rule updates by the LPC, LMFT, Social Worker and Psychology Boards and discuss changes that may be required to ensure compliance.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • Review Texas privacy statutes and recent amendments to the federal HIPAA privacy regulations and understand how these recent amendments impact a mental health practice and what actions are required to remain in compliance with state and federal law.
  • Understand recent amendments to the LPC, LMFT, Social Worker and Psychology Board Rules with special emphasis on how the rules apply to real world situations and a highlight of changes that may be needed to ensure that a professional’s mental health practice is in compliance with applicable Board rules.
  • Review the areas of a mental health practice that are most likely to lead to Board complaints and what steps can be taken to protect a professional license and avoid the conflicts that often lead to complaints.
  • Review the complaint, investigation and disciplinary process for mental health boards in Texas.

 

ABOUT OUR SPEAKER

Kenda Dalrymple is a Partner in the firm of Carls, McDonald & Dalrymple, L.L.P. in Austin, Texas. She earned her B.A. in Communications from Baylor University and her law degree from Baylor University School of Law.

Kenda practices in the areas of administrative and health law, with an emphasis on representing licensed professionals before their licensing boards and advising them on matters related to their practices. She is married to her college sweetheart, Bill Dalrymple, and they live in Cedar Park where they cater to the whims of four dogs.

with Rick Gaskill at The Ecumenical Center

November 12th – 13th

Event Info

Date: Feb 19, 2015 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Location: The Ecumenical Center – 8310 Ewing Halsell Dr.

About

More details will be forthcoming. Watch this space for the workshop description and learning objectives.

Why are some types of thoughts so challenging? Some of our patterns of thinking create significant suffering in our mind. Thoughts can lead to anxiety, depression, and anger. Our thoughts can be incessantly judgmental, repetitive, compulsive, worry-filled, anxious, and self-critical. Yet other thoughts can lead to happiness, calm, and peace.

This daylong will explore how we can use mindfulness to transform difficult thinking, led by Diana Winston with a special morning conversation with actress and author Mariel Hemingway.

Through mindfulness we can learn to not believe everything we think, distinguish helpful from harmful thinking, let go of repetitive unhelpful thoughts, and use thought in helpful ways to bring more happiness. The day will also include a basic introduction to mindfulness and tools for getting started with daily practice.

Mindfulness is paying attention to our present moment experiences with openness, curiosity, and a willingness to be with what is. It has scientific support to reduce anxiety, improve health outcomes, reduce emotional reactivity, create positive emotions, and even positively impact brain structure.

This day is intended for clinicians, mental health professionals, chaplains, or anyone from the general public who wishes to learn mindfulness for personal use and to apply it with their clients, patients, and those they work with. While the emphasis will be on developing one’s personal mindfulness practice and tools, these tools are transferable. Appropriate for beginners or people with experience. The day will employ a number of modalities, including lecture, group discussion, interpersonal exercises. The center piece of the day will be walking and sitting meditation, to allow the participants to fully explore the benefit of mindfulness practiced over a full day.

About our Speaker

Diana Winston has been the Director of Mindfulness Education at UCLA Semel Institute’s Mindful Awareness Research Center www.marc.ucla.edu since 2006. She is the co-author (with Susan Smalley, Ph.D.) of Fully Present: The Science, Art, and Practice of Mindfulness and the CD, “Mindful Meditations” (2008). She has been teaching mindfulness nationally and internationally since 1993 and has brought mindful awareness into schools, hospitals, businesses, and nonprofits, as well as to leaders, educators, and health professionals in the US and Asia. Her work has been mentioned in the New York Times, Newsweek, O Magazine, Women’s Health Magazine, CBS and ABC News, and the LA Times, among others. She has been called by the LA Times: “one of the nation’s leading mindfulness teachers.”

 

Despite the negative view that most of society has toward the teenage population, these children often have tremendous obstacles to overcome in their life and are in desperate need of support and encouragement. This workshop will help participants learn how to connect with teenagers and understand common developmental misconceptions that often encourage negative stereotypes. Developmental stages of communication will be reviewed and interventions will be discussed to assist participants in developing and appropriate approach to treatment. Participants will be encouraged to explore their values toward this population and reconnect with the healing power of play.

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will be able to identify three phases in the development of communication.
  2. Participants will be able to identify a primary need of adolescents.
  3. Participants will be able to identify rationale for using process-based play therapy interventions.

Speaker

Scott Riviere, MS, LPC, RPT-S, is a Licensed Professional Counselor and Director of K.I.D.Z., Inc. During his 20+ years of practice, he has worked in various clinical settings and has extensive training in the field of Play Therapy. He has created several therapeutic products for mental health professionals and Scott is a published author and frequent guest on various media outlets.

with Cyra Dumitru

Event Info

Date: Mar 26, 2015 9:00 am – 4:30 pm & Mar 27, 2015 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Location: The Ecumenical Center – 8310 Ewing Halsell Dr.

About

Many mental health professionals have a basic understanding of the use of the sand tray in the therapeutic setting. However, many have not had ongoing, in-depth training on understanding the process of how it works – for example, in trauma-informed work – and a wider-use with children, teens, adults, couples, and families.

This training will focus on trauma-informed work, weaving in the importance of spiritual issues. Also, understanding the dynamics of using sand tray with various age ranges, a variety of client configurations (individual, joint, groups, parents, families), and what we know/believe about how the brain interacts/reacts to the sand tray therapy process.

Attendees will participate in sand tray experiences throughout both days, both in the role as a client and the sand tray therapist. Attendees are asked to bring 10-15 miniatures with them.

Facilitator

Linda E. Homeyer, PhD, LPC-S, RPT-S

Dr. Homeyer is a Professor in the Professional Counseling Program at Texas State University. She served several years on the Texas Association for Play Therapy Board of Directors and served two terms as President of the Association for Play Therapy Board of Directors. Dr. Homeyer is the 2013 recipient of APT’s Lifetime Achievement Award and Director Emerita in 2014. In addition to teaching internationally and throughout the United States, she was named an Honorary Professor of International Studies by Texas State University in 2014. Dr. Homeyer has authored many books, chapters, and journal articles in the area of play therapy and sandtray therapy and many have been translated into Chinese, Russian, Korean, and Spanish. Her current areas of interest include exploring spirituality in play therapy.

at The Ecumenical Center

Here we are in the wonderful season of Halloween! This is THE favorite holiday of many children. While the potential of gaining pounds of candy is certainly enticing to children, it’s the costumes that seem to ignite their enthusiasm and potentially awaken their creativity. The value of becoming Princesses and Super Heroes isn’t difficult to grasp, but what about the dark side of Halloween? Can it really be useful, possibly even essential, for children to express their monstrous, evil side? Absolutely! In this workshop you will be introduced to the value of shadow work within the play of children. The dark archetypes of Halloween will be explored as vital influences in a child’s development. AND…You will make your own monster to take back to your office as a symbolic advisor and guide to surviving the perils of childhood.

This is a bring-your-own brown bag lunch. The Center will provide drinks.

Objectives

  1. Participants will learn about the Jungian concept of shadow work and how Halloween can be a natural opportunity for children to experience this vital process.
  2. The archetypes that surface within the Halloween experience will be examined and explored.
  3. Participants will make their own monsters and discuss how this “co-therapist” might enlighten their clinical work.

About the Speaker

updo_over_shoulder.IMG_0026.jpgVicki Williams-Patterson has worked as an art therapist since 1983. Her graduate education at Hahnemann University was strongly rooted in developmental psychology and psychodynamic theory, and she has continued with that orientation. Since 1990, she has been conducting seminars on the therapeutic uses of art in the counseling process at local, regional and national conferences.  Since receiving her graduate degree in Art Therapy, she has engaged in advanced professional training in the areas of trauma recovery, Jungian psychology, and Sand Tray Process. In November 2009 she received the American Art Therapy Association’s Annual Award for Clinical Services. She has served as President of the Mental Health Counselors Association, a division of the Texas Counseling Association.

As people live longer with chronic illness, the issues surrounding palliative care grows. Skilled and successful conversations are critical in order to fully understand the context of a patient’s illness in a way that permits ethical decision-making.

with Vicki Williams Patterson at The Ecumenical Center

This workshop will introduce counselors to Art Therapy interventions designed to help clients working through grief and loss. Participants will receive a brief introduction to Worden’s Tasks of Grief. Activities explored will include the altar/memorial box, intangible gifts sand bottle, and memorial collage candle. Participants will have the opportunity to create their choice of intervention.

This is a bring-your-own brown bag lunch. The Center will provide drinks.

 Objectives

  1. Describe Worden’s Tasks of Grief
  2. Describe the therapeutic applications of practiced art interventions with clients experiencing grief
  3. Apply practiced Memorial Art interventions with clients experiencing grief

About the Speaker

Salina Shelton, LPC, MA specializes in individual and group therapy. Among her areas of expertise are chronic pain, grief, depression, anxiety, and career counseling. She presents workshops on the topics of Art Therapy, Grief, and Innovation.

Event Info

Date: Oct 29, 2015 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Location: The Ecumenical Center – 8310 Ewing Halsell Dr.

About

Please watch this space for more details as they become available.

at The Ecumenical Center

Don’t miss this wonderful time to be in a peaceful and supportive space as you make art with free supplies!

This is an ongoing Project of the “Art Heals Hearts” program…a wonderful opportunity for people of ALL AGES (6 to 106 years) to use art materials in a playful manner in a relaxed setting. This creative experience is FREE! All materials are provided. Download the entire schedule here.

openstudio.jpg

Upcoming Dates:

Click on the date to register.

Saturday, September 24

Saturday, October 22

Saturday, November 26

Children 6 years old and up are welcome. Children ages 6-16 must be accompanied by an adult. Please register, as we have limited seating.

Questions: Vicki Williams-Patterson, consulting art therapist at The Ecumenical Center, vpatterson -at- ecrh.org, 210-582-5804.

Register by clicking on the dates above.

 

 

Each day, campers will create artisan birdhouses, masks, poetry and music in an interactive and educational setting. Campers will be taught how to recognize bullying, build coping strategies, learn about nutrition and strengthen self-esteem. Campers will walk away with skills that will help them learn how to cope when presented with difficult situations.

Complimentary Camp Includes: Back bag with all necessary materials to participate in the Virtual Camp Wellness

For children ages 5 years -13 years old.

Seating is limited.

2020 R Camp Wellness – LINK TO THE APPLICATION Complete the Registration and return by due date.

 

Registrations must be received by July 24, 2020 to Lcenanovic@ecrh.org

at The Ecumenical Center

Don’t miss this wonderful time to be in a peaceful and supportive space as you make art with free supplies!

This is an ongoing Project of the “Art Heals Hearts” program…a wonderful opportunity for people of ALL AGES (6 to 106 years) to use art materials in a playful manner in a relaxed setting. This creative experience is FREE! All materials are provided. Download the entire schedule here.

openstudio.jpg

Upcoming Dates:

Click on the date to register.

Saturday, October 22

Saturday, November 26

Children 6 years old and up are welcome. Children ages 6-16 must be accompanied by an adult. Please register, as we have limited seating.

Questions: Vicki Williams-Patterson, consulting art therapist at The Ecumenical Center, vpatterson -at- ecrh.org, 210-582-5804.

Register by clicking on the dates above.

Event Info

Date: Nov 12, 2015 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Location: The Ecumenical Center – 8310 Ewing Halsell Dr.

About

Over the past two decades, research has clearly documented the vulnerability of the developing brain and the negative impact of social and emotional trauma on brain functioning. It is now apparent that traumatic and neglectful developmental experiences alter normal brain development in all parts of the brain depending on the nature of the maltreatment, developmental stage of the child, and the quality of the nurturing environment. Science now informs us that these factors cause disorganization in specific areas of the brain and that play therapy interventions are not equally effective in all brain regions. While play therapy embodies many neurobiological principles, a “one size fits all” therapeutic approach will be less effective than one designed for the brain regions affected. As play therapists learn and apply a few fundamental concepts of brain development, brain organization, and the impact of trauma we are better able to identify play therapy interventions likely to be effective treatment options.

Objectives

  1. Learn key neurobiological concepts critical to intervention design
  2. Identify important developmental play activities impacting specific brain regions
  3. Integrate developmental play activities into play therapy treatment design

Facilitator

Rick Gaskill, Ed.D., LCP, RPT-S, LCPC

Dr. Gaskill has worked in mental health for 40 years and is currently the Director of Sumner Mental Health Center in Wellington, KS. He was the first RPTS in Kansas and teaches play therapy at Wichita State University. He was named a Fellow of the Child Trauma Academy in 2004, the Kansas Head Start Partner of the Year in 2005, and was honored for his Exemplary Service to Children and Families at the Kansas Governor’s Conference in 2014. Dr. Gaskill has published work on the neurobiology of play therapy and has lectured extensively in the US, Canada, and Australia.

at The Ecumenical Center

Don’t miss this wonderful time to be in a peaceful and supportive space as you make art with free supplies!

This is an ongoing Project of the “Art Heals Hearts” program…a wonderful opportunity for people of ALL AGES (6 to 106 years) to use art materials in a playful manner in a relaxed setting. This creative experience is FREE! All materials are provided. Download the entire schedule here.

openstudio.jpg

Upcoming Dates:

Click on the date to register.

Saturday, November 26

Children 6 years old and up are welcome. Children ages 6-16 must be accompanied by an adult. Please register, as we have limited seating.

Questions: Vicki Williams-Patterson, consulting art therapist at The Ecumenical Center, vpatterson -at- ecrh.org, 210-582-5804.

by Vicki Williams Patterson at The Ecumenical Center

with Cyra Dumitru

new_ahh

YOU ARE INVITED TO ATTEND
ART, MUSIC & POETRY EXHIBITION

Benefiting the Children’s Open Art Studio and Its Programs.

Noted local artist Franco Mondini-Ruiz will be on-site creating portraits, with a portion of the proceeds benefiting The Ecumenical Center.

Please join us and enjoy hors d’oeuvres.

SEPTEMBER 9, 2016 | 6-8 P.M.

RSVP by September 6 to 210.616.0885 or email lcenanovic@ecrh.org

Business casual. Valet parking available. Click here for underwriting opportunities.
Visual arts exhibit opens September 9 and continues through January 6, 2017

Play Therapy Supervisionsand tray therapy

The Ecumenical Center offers group supervision for those who have a master’s-level degree in Mental Health and are trying to attain Registered Play Therapy status or Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor status or would like a place to consult with other play therapists.

Fee:

Registration is $45 for 2 hours of group supervision and $60 for 1 hour.

For registration and payment, contact Lejla Cenanovic – lcenanovic@ecrh.org

Lead by:

Nancy Franklin, LCSW, Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor.

 

Date and Time:

Third Tuesday of every month from 10 a.m. – 12:00 Noon.

January 16

February 20

March 20

April 17

May 15

June 19

July 17

August 21

September 18

October 16

November 20

December 18

This interactive and exploratory workshop will focus on a variety of seldom examined issues that emerge in play therapy relationships: play therapy as a process of living out beliefs about a child rather than applying techniques, methods or skills; the play therapist as a person of commitment and passion; expectancy versus expectations; and returning responsibility to children.

In this workshop, a way of Being With a child will be explored that touches the inner person of the child that is waiting to come forth and be experienced. This workshop will challenge you to look within and to examine your core beliefs about children and the therapeutic process. Workshop activities will include experiential learning about yourself and videos of Dr. Landreth’s play therapy sessions.

Objectives:

Following the workshop, participants will be able to:

1) construct a model of how play facilitates the process of self discovery;

2) describe how the person of the play therapist is a therapeutic variable;

3) explain how play therapy is a process rather than an event;

4) identify four healing messages needed by children;

5)identify the basis for a child’s behavior;

6) describe how to empower a child by returning responsibility to the child;

7) explain the concept of “being with” a child in play therapy and

8) identify dimensions of the play therapy relationship that are therapeutic.

Bio.  Garry Landreth, LPC, RPT-S, internationally recognized for his writings and work in promoting the development of child-centered play therapy, is a Regents Professor Emeritus in the Department of Counseling and founder of the Center for Play Therapy at the University of North Texas. His more than 150 journal articles, books and DVDs include the 2020 2nd edition Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT): An Evidence-Based 10-Session Filial Therapy Model and the accompanying 2020 2nd edition Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT) Treatment Manual. Dr. Landreth’s other recent publications include the 2014 DVD CPRT In Action: Four Couples In A CPRT Group and the 2012 3rd edition of the Taylor & Francis Best Seller Play Therapy: The Art of the Relationship. His CPRT Model received the Best Practices in Parent/Family Education Award. Dr. Landreth is Director Emeritus of the Association for Play Therapy (APT). He received the APT Lifetime Achievement Award and the APT Research Award.

Each day, campers will create artisan birdhouses, masks, poetry and music in an interactive and educational setting. Campers will be taught how to recognize bullying, build coping strategies, learn about nutrition and strengthen self-esteem. Campers will walk away with skills that will help them learn how to cope when presented with difficult situations.

Camp-registration-2019 – please complete the application and email to DDailey@ecrh.org by July 16, 2019 

Please join us for a working lunch at The Center with Rev. Dr. George Mason, senior pastor at Wilshire Baptist Church in Dallas, Texas. Mason will be presenting on lessons learned from a brush with Ebola and serving as the face of faith at the heart of a crisis. He will be followed by a panel discussion with Rev. Dr. Louis Zbinden, Rabbi Dr. Samuel Stahl, Rev. Dr. Don Anderson and Dr. Charles Lerner.

Rev. Dr. Mason made the choice to issue a press release that one of his congregants, Louise Troh, had been placed in quarantine. Troh had been planning her upcoming marriage to Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person in the U.S. to be diagnosed with Ebola and the first to lose his life to the disease. In one article, Mason was quoted as saying, “Anyone would be surprised at how close this has been to home,” Mason said. “But I think our church has prepared as best we can. If it had to happen somewhere, let’s just say that we feel the burden of this privilege, this terrifying privilege. Regardless of the outcome, we’ll walk beside them and be good stewards of this tragedy.”

They were words he and his congregation lived out — literally and figuratively — embracing her in love while many others in the community shunned her in fear.

mason.jpegMeet Rev. Dr. George Mason

The Rev. Dr. George Mason has been the senior pastor of the Wilshire Baptist Church in Dallas, TX, for 25 years. He is a native New Yorker and holds a business degree from the University of Miami and both master of divinity and doctor of philosophy degrees from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. He has been active in social justice pursuits in race relations, public education and payday lending. Most recently, he has been given the Dallas County Medical Society Award for Non-Physician of the Year for his work in the Ebola crisis in Dallas.

Play Therapy Supervisionsand tray therapy

The Ecumenical Center offers group supervision for those who have a master’s-level degree in Mental Health and are trying to attain Registered Play Therapy status or Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor status or would like a place to consult with other play therapists.

Fee:

Registration is $45 for 2 hours of group supervision and $60 for 1 hour.

For registration and payment, contact Lejla Cenanovic – lcenanovic@ecrh.org

Lead by:

Nancy Franklin, LCSW, Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor.

 

Date and Time:

Third Tuesday of every month from 10 a.m. – 12:00 Noon.

January 16

February 20

March 20

April 17

May 15

June 19

July 17

August 21

September 18

October 16

November 20

December 18

The ten commandments at The Ecumenical Center

Ever since Moses came down from Mt. Sinai, the 10 Commandments have stood as a cornerstone of spiritual faith and earthly behavior for every form of Judaism and Christianity, and as important fundamental principles for secular law around the world and through the ages. Obviously, they have great meaning for us today. So join us at The Center for a special luncheon focusing on this topic from a Judeo-Christian perspective.

  • Free of charge
  • Coordinated and led by Rabbi Samuel M. Stahl
  • Facilitated by Dr. Leslie Hollon
  • Wednesday, November 16 from 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • Designed for clergy but open to lay scholars, as well
  • At The Ecumenical Center

Call 210-616-0885 to register.

Play Therapy Supervisionsand tray therapy

The Ecumenical Center offers group supervision for those who have a master’s-level degree in Mental Health and are trying to attain Registered Play Therapy status or Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor status or would like a place to consult with other play therapists.

Fee:

Registration is $45 for 2 hours of group supervision and $60 for 1 hour.

For registration and payment, contact Lejla Cenanovic – lcenanovic@ecrh.org

Lead by:

Nancy Franklin, LCSW, Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor.

 

Date and Time:

Third Tuesday of every month from 10 a.m. – 12:00 Noon.

January 16

February 20

March 20

April 17

May 15

June 19

July 17

August 21

September 18

October 16

November 20

December 18

The Art Heals Hearts Private Art Exhibition & Sale is an invite-only event.

The Ecumenical Center’s VIP Private Art Sale & Preview Exhibition features exquisite art pieces by professional artists. The pieces will be on display and available for sale. This event will have live music, two artists painting live, and spirits and hors d’oeuvres.

You will witness how the power of expression can bring special healing.

Proceeds will benefit the Children’s Open Art Studio and its programs in San Antonio and Sutherland Springs.

For more information please call 210.616.0885 or email Lejla at Lcenanovic@ecrh.org.

 

Click here for sponsorship opportunities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To register please download and complete the application: 2020 R Camp Wellness

The application needs to be received by July 24, 2020 – Lcenanovic@ecrh.org for any other questions please call (210)616-0885

 

Play Therapy Supervisionsand tray therapy

The Ecumenical Center offers group supervision for those who have a master’s-level degree in Mental Health and are trying to attain Registered Play Therapy status or Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor status or would like a place to consult with other play therapists.

Fee:

Registration is $45 for 2 hours of group supervision and $60 for 1 hour.

For registration and payment, contact Lejla Cenanovic – lcenanovic@ecrh.org

Lead by:

Nancy Franklin, LCSW, Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor.

 

Date and Time:

Third Tuesday of every month from 10 a.m. – 12:00 Noon.

January 16

February 20

March 20

April 17

May 15

June 19

July 17

August 21

September 18

October 16

November 20

December 18

At a time when more than half of U.S. physicians show at least one sign of burnout, compassion is an important feature of well-being. Compassion is characterized by insight, the intention to end suffering, and “attentional balance” – the capacity to attend both to others and to ourselves. Research suggests that compassion may enhance resilience. Cultivating compassion has potential benefits to both health professionals and the patients they seek to heal.  Hear an ethical perspective from Roshi Joan Halifax, PhD, Founder, Abbot, Head Teacher, Upaya Institute and Zen Center, Santa Fe, New Mexico. This Conversation About Ethics consists of two events:

 

Luncheon Seminar
Tuesday, July 23, 2019
11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m.
The Ecumenical Center
8310 Ewing Halsell | 210-616-0885
Explore a practical, context-sensitive model for cultivating compassion through interactions with others.

 

Evening Keynote
Tuesday, July 23, 2019
5:00 p.m. Reception | 6 – 7 p.m. Lecture
UT Health Science Center | Pestana Lecture Hall 3.104A
7703 Floyd Curl | 210-567-0795
This talk addresses strategies for harnessing compassion to develop resiliency and capacity to attend to others.

 

Our Speaker

Roshi Joan Halifax, Ph.D., is a Buddhist teacher, Zen priest, anthropologist, and pioneer in the field of end-of-life care. She is Founder, Abbot, and Head Teacher of Upaya Institute and Zen Center in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She received her Ph.D. in medical anthropology in 1973 and has lectured on the subject of death and dying at many academic institutions and medical centers around the world. She received a National Science Foundation Fellowship in Visual Anthropology, was an Honorary Research Fellow in Medical Ethnobotany at Harvard University, and was a Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the Library of Congress.

 

From 1972-1975, she worked with psychiatrist Stanislav Grof at the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center with dying cancer patients. She has continued to work with dying people and their families, and to teach health care professionals and family caregivers the psycho-social, ethical and spiritual aspects of care of the dying. She is Director of the Project on Being with Dying, and Founder of the Upaya Prison Project that develops programs on meditation for prisoners. She is also founder of the Nomads Clinic in Nepal.

She studied for a decade with Zen Teacher Seung Sahn and was a teacher in the Kwan Um Zen School. She received the Lamp Transmission from Thich Nhat Hanh, and was given Inka by Roshi Bernie Glassman.

A Founding Teacher of the Zen Peacemaker Order and founder of Prajna Mountain Buddhist Order, her work and practice for more than four decades has focused on engaged Buddhism. Her books include: The Human Encounter with Death (with Stanislav Grof); The Fruitful Darkness, A Journey Through Buddhist PracticeSimplicity in the ComplexA Buddhist Life in AmericaBeing with Dying: Cultivating Compassion and Wisdom in the Presence of Death; and her recently released, Standing at the Edge: Finding Freedom Where Fear and Courage Meet.

 

Conversations About Ethics is presented by Methodist Healthcare Ministries, UT Health San Antonio Center for Medical Humanities and Ethics and The Ecumenical Center.

Play Therapy Supervisionsand tray therapy

The Ecumenical Center offers group supervision for those who have a master’s-level degree in Mental Health and are trying to attain Registered Play Therapy status or Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor status or would like a place to consult with other play therapists.

Fee:

Registration is $45 for 2 hours of group supervision and $60 for 1 hour.

For registration and payment, contact Lejla Cenanovic – lcenanovic@ecrh.org

Lead by:

Nancy Franklin, LCSW, Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor.

 

Date and Time:

Third Tuesday of every month from 10 a.m. – 12:00 Noon.

January 16

February 20

March 20

April 17

May 15

June 19

July 17

August 21

September 18

October 16

November 20

December 18

Play Therapy Supervisionsand tray therapy

The Ecumenical Center offers group supervision for those who have a master’s-level degree in Mental Health and are trying to attain Registered Play Therapy status or Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor status or would like a place to consult with other play therapists.

Fee:

Registration is $45 for 2 hours of group supervision and $60 for 1 hour.

For registration and payment, contact Lejla Cenanovic – lcenanovic@ecrh.org

Lead by:

Nancy Franklin, LCSW, LMFT, Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor.

 

Date and Time:

Third Thursday of every month from 10 a.m. – 12:00 Noon.

January 18

February 15

March 15

April 19

May 17

June 17

July 19

August 16

September 20

October 18

November 15

December 20

Registered Play Therapy Supervisionsand tray therapy

The Ecumenical Center offers group supervision for those who have a master’s-level degree in Mental Health and are trying to attain Registered Play Therapy status or Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor status or would like a place to consult with other play therapists.

Fee:

Registration is $45 for 2 hours of group supervision and $60 for 1 hour.

For registration and payment, contact Lejla Cenanovic – lcenanovic@ecrh.org

Lead by:

Nancy Franklin, LCSW, LMFT, Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor.

 

Date and Time:

Third Thursday of every month from 10 a.m. – 12:00 Noon.

January 18

February 15

March 15

April 19

May 17

June 17

July 19

August 16

September 20

October 18

November 15

December 20

Registered Play Therapy Supervisionsand tray therapy

The Ecumenical Center offers group supervision for those who have a master’s-level degree in Mental Health and are trying to attain Registered Play Therapy status or Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor status or would like a place to consult with other play therapists.

Fee:

Registration is $45 for 2 hours of group supervision and $60 for 1 hour.

For registration and payment, contact Lejla Cenanovic – lcenanovic@ecrh.org

Lead by:

Nancy Franklin, LCSW, LMFT, Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor.

 

Date and Time:

Third Thursday of every month from 10 a.m. – 12:00 Noon.

January 18

February 15

March 15

April 19

May 17

June 17

July 19

August 16

September 20

October 18

November 15

December 20

Registered Play Therapy Supervisionsand tray therapy

The Ecumenical Center offers group supervision for those who have a master’s-level degree in Mental Health and are trying to attain Registered Play Therapy status or Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor status or would like a place to consult with other play therapists.

Fee:

Registration is $45 for 2 hours of group supervision and $60 for 1 hour.

For registration and payment, contact Lejla Cenanovic – lcenanovic@ecrh.org

Lead by:

Nancy Franklin, LCSW, LMFT, Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor.

 

Date and Time:

Third Thursday of every month from 10 a.m. – 12:00 Noon.

January 18

February 15

March 15

April 19

May 17

June 17

July 19

August 16

September 20

October 18

November 15

December 20

Registered Play Therapy Supervisionsand tray therapy

The Ecumenical Center offers group supervision for those who have a master’s-level degree in Mental Health and are trying to attain Registered Play Therapy status or Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor status or would like a place to consult with other play therapists.

Fee:

Registration is $45 for 2 hours of group supervision and $60 for 1 hour.

For registration and payment, contact Lejla Cenanovic – lcenanovic@ecrh.org

Lead by:

Nancy Franklin, LCSW, LMFT, Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor.

 

Date and Time:

Third Thursday of every month from 10 a.m. – 12:00 Noon.

January 18

February 15

March 15

April 19

May 17

June 17

July 19

August 16

September 20

October 18

November 15

December 20

Registered Play Therapy Supervisionsand tray therapy

The Ecumenical Center offers group supervision for those who have a master’s-level degree in Mental Health and are trying to attain Registered Play Therapy status or Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor status or would like a place to consult with other play therapists.

Fee:

Registration is $45 for 2 hours of group supervision and $60 for 1 hour.

For registration and payment, contact Lejla Cenanovic – lcenanovic@ecrh.org

Lead by:

Nancy Franklin, LCSW, LMFT, Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor.

 

Date and Time:

Third Thursday of every month from 10 a.m. – 12:00 Noon.

January 18

February 15

March 15

April 19

May 17

June 17

July 19

August 16

September 20

October 18

November 15

December 20

Registered Play Therapy Supervisionsand tray therapy

The Ecumenical Center offers group supervision for those who have a master’s-level degree in Mental Health and are trying to attain Registered Play Therapy status or Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor status or would like a place to consult with other play therapists.

Fee:

Registration is $45 for 2 hours of group supervision and $60 for 1 hour.

For registration and payment, contact Lejla Cenanovic – lcenanovic@ecrh.org

Lead by:

Nancy Franklin, LCSW, LMFT, Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor.

 

Date and Time:

Third Thursday of every month from 10 a.m. – 12:00 Noon.

January 18

February 15

March 15

April 19

May 17

June 17

July 19

August 16

September 20

October 18

November 15

December 20

Join us Tuesday, February 28th from 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. at The Center as US veteran, Kris “Tanto” Paronto sets the record straight about what happened when terrorists attacked the US State Department Mission compound.

The book and movie, 13 HOURS, offer an unforgettable account of what six brave American security operators faced as they performed acts of courage and heroism.

Make your reservations early – seating is limited.

RSVP to Lcenanovic@ecrh.org or call 210.616.0885.

The Ecumenical Center is proud to host Kris “Tanto” Paronto as part of our ongoing effort to draw attention to the needs of our veterans and the sacrifices they make to keep us safe.  

 

 

The Ecumenical Center - Life After Loss

 

Life after Loss Facilitator’s training is designed for those who want to support others with their grief journey.

 

Are you a health care professional? (Clergy, Doctor, Nurse, Medical or Clinical Social Worker, or Licensed Counselor)

Have you had experience in bereavement?

Do you see a need in your community for a bereavement support group?

Do you have a working knowledge of issues related to grief and loss?

Do you have a support group leadership experience?

 

Following the training are you willing to facilitate or co-facilitate at least one 6 seek Life and Loss session per year?

To register please complete the form and email it back to Lcenanovic@ecrh.org

LAL Facilitator Application

2019 March Training Information

Questions about the training please contact Lejla Cenanovic (210) 616-0885

 

 

 

 

This program will provide a review and discussion of state and federal laws, rules and regulations and ethical guidelines that apply to licensed mental health professionals who provide mental health and forensic services to children and families.  A family’s relationship is often interrupted by death, divorce, separation, the involvement of CPS or other agencies, or serious health or mental health diagnosis that requires outside intervention.  There are additional ethical and legal considerations that must be understood and considered by mental health professionals who provide services to children and families.  There will be specific instructions on identifying the client, dealing with families in litigation, responding to requests for records, and maintaining professional ethics in legal situations.  Attendees will gain an understanding of how the legal system works and the importance of staying within the role of a therapist when dealing with a family in crisis.

 

 

Specific Learning Objectives:

 

  1. Understand state and federal laws that apply to provide mental health services to children and families.

 

  1. Understand specific ethical guidelines that apply to provide mental health services to children and families.

 

  1. Understand Texas law regarding mandatory reports of suspected abuse and neglect of a child, an elderly person, or a disabled person.

 

  1. Maintain professional boundaries when dealing with the legal system or families in crisis.

 

Kenda Dalrymple is a Partner in the firm of Dalrymple, Shellhorse, Ellis & Diamond,

L.L.P. in Austin, Texas.  She earned her B.A. in Communications from Baylor University

and her law degree from Baylor University School of Law.  She practices in the areas of

administrative and health law, with an emphasis on representing licensed professionals

before their licensing boards and advising them on matters related to their practices.  She

is married to her college sweetheart, Bill Dalrymple, and they live in Cedar Park with four bossy little poodles.

 

 

For more than a decade, Ethics in Business San Antonio has been fostering an environment where ethical business practices are recognized and shared for the benefit of the workplace and our community. The Luncheon is a unique opportunity for students from The University of Texas at San Antonio, St. Mary’s University, Trinity University and the University of the Incarnate Word to learn from high integrity business leaders.

The Ethics in Business San Antonio spring luncheon will be on Tuesday, May 7, at the San Antonio Country Club, beginning at 11:30 a.m. We are pleased to announce this year’s winners of the Lahourcade Award for excellence in ethical decision-making are Valero and The Ziegler Family.

Proceeds for the event support the education, counseling and wellness programs at The Center, which is dedicated to healing and growth in our community.

We hope you can join us and support this special event to cultivate more ethical leaders that lead to healthy businesses and communities.

2019 Ethics in Business Lahourcade Award Recipients:

  • VALERO
  • THE ZIEGLER FAMILY

Keynote Speaker:

Mr. Mark Schmeltekopf – Valero

 

Ethics in Business Underwriting Form

RSVP or Question please contact Lejla Cenanovic (210) 616-0885 or Lcenanovic@ecrh.org 

 

 

Legacy Of Hope - Naomi Judd small poster

 

The Center’s annual Legacy of Hope Luncheon offers the unique opportunity to hear inspirational testimonies from prestigious speakers on how they overcame significant life struggles. This year’s speaker is singer-songwriter and actress Naomi Judd.

A six-time Grammy Award Winner, Judd has also authored several self-help books including her memoir, “River of Time: My Descent Into Depression and How I Emerged With Hope.” Having experienced childhood abuse, panic attacks, and years of psychiatric treatments, Judd is now a motivational speaker and mental health advocate who travels the country sharing her story of healing and hope.

The Center will also be honoring longtime supporters Dale and Mertie Wood as our Legacy Award honorees. We extend our thanks to the dedicated co-chairs of this event, Kirti & Dr. Mahendra Patel, and Karen & J. Scott Beckendorf, as well as to the Foundation Board chairmen, Kelly & Carl Fellbaum.

Please join us on:

Wednesday, September 11, 2019
San Antonio Country Club
11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m

RSVP by August 21

This program will provide an overview and discussion of state and federal laws, rules and regulations that govern the practice of a mental health professional.  The presentation will discuss Texas confidentiality statutes, the privacy regulations under the federal Health Insurance Privacy and Portability Act (HIPAA) and recent amendments to Texas Family Code, Chapter 107 regarding child custody evaluations in family law cases and how to testify in court. The program will review recent rule updates by the LPC, LMFT, Social Worker and Psychology Boards and discuss changes that may be required to ensure compliance.

There will be specific instruction on responding to requests for mental health records, including requests from clients and subpoenas, and appropriate testimony in court by a treating mental health professional who is subpoenaed to a hearing or deposition. The program will review legal requirements for documenting mental health services and highlight best practices for improving the quality of records.

Finally, this program will review the most common sources for Board complaints against mental health professionals and provid e practical strategies for protecting a professional ‘s license and livelihood.

Learning Objectives

  • Review Texas privacy statutes and recent amendments to the federal HIPAA privacy regulations and understand how these recent amendments impact a mental health practice and what actions are required to remain in compliance with state and federal law.
  • Understand recent amendments to the LPC, LMFT, Social Worker and Psychology Board Rules with special emphasis on how the rules apply to real world situations and a highlight of changes that may be needed to ensure that a professional’s mental health practice is in compliance with applicable Board rules.
  • Review basic requirements for documentation of mental health services as required by various Board rules and program requirements, and learn specific techniques to improve the quality of mental health records.
  • Review amendments to Chapter 107 of the Texas Family Code regarding social studies, and the expected impact of these amendments on mental health professionals who treat children, adults and families involved in Suits Affecting the Parent-Child Relationship (SAPCR) and how these changes affect a mental health practitioner.
  • Discuss the appropriate scope of testimony for a mental health professional in a Suit Affecting the Parent-Child Relationship (SAPCR) and common pitfalls in testimony that can result in liability or Board complaint cases.
  • Review the areas of a mental health practice that are most likely to lead to Board complaints and what steps can be taken to protect a professional license and avoid the conflicts that often lead to complaints.
  • Review the complaint, investigation and disciplinary process for mental health boards in Texas.

Speaker

Kenda Dalrymple is a Partner in the firm of Carls, McDonald & Dalrymple, L.L.P. in Austin, Texas. She earned her B.A. in Communications from Baylor University and her law degree from Baylor University School of Law.  She practices in the areas of administrative and health law, with an emphasis on representing licensed professionals before their licensing boards and advising them on matters related to their practices.  She is married to her college sweetheart, Bill Dalrymple, and they live in Cedar Park with their daughter Erin and three poodles.

The Ecumenical Center’s Public Art Sale & Exhibition & Sale features exquisite art pieces by professional artists. The pieces will be on display and available for sale.

You will witness how the power of expression can bring special healing.

Proceeds will benefit the Children’s Open Art Studio and its programs in San Antonio and Sutherland Springs.

For more information please call 210.616.0885 or email Lejla at Lcenanovic@ecrh.org.

 

Click here for sponsorship opportunities.

 

WHAT IS LIFE AFTER LOSS PROGRAM:

Life After Loss is a program of The Ecumenical Center designed to help people better understand the process of grief and how to live through it in a way that is healing. It provides a place to share experiences and to support one other. Each six-week session is a combination of teaching, discussion, and learning activities. Led by trained facilitators with knowledge of bereavement and grief support, the sessions are open to those who have experienced the loss of a loved one, and there is no charge for the program.

Sessions cover the physical, emotional, spiritual and social implications of grief; the process of grief; memories and how to use them to heal; how to take care of yourself while you grieve; holidays and anniversary dates and planning for the future. Attending all six sessions is most beneficial, therefore no new participants are accepted after the second session.

 

FOR THOSE WHO WANT TO SUPPORT OTHERS WITH THEIR GRIEF JOURNEY

Are you a health care professional?

(Clergy, doctor, nurse, medical or clinical social worker, or licensed counselor)

Have you had experience in bereavement?

Do you see a need in your community for bereavement support group?

Do you have a working knowledge of issues related to grief and loss?

Do you have support group leadership experience?

Following the training, are you willing to facilitate or co-facilitate at least one

6 week Life after Loss session per year?

PLEASE COMPLETE THE APPLICATION

https://www.ecrh.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/LAL-Facilitator-Application.pdf

AND SEND IT BACK TO :

LEJLA CENANOVIC

LCENANOVIC@ECRH.ORG

 8310 Ewing Halsell Drive

San Antonio, TX  78229

(210) 616 – 0885

 

2020 March LAL Training Info Link to the Application

Texas has the highest rate of maternal mortality in the developed world. Hear an ethical perspective from Laurie Zoloth, PhD, a leading bioethicist and dean of the University of Chicago Divinity School on Monday, June 19, 2017. This Conversation About Ethics consists of two events:
Luncheon Seminar
Monday, June 19, 2017
11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
The Ecumenical Center
8310 Ewing Halsell | 210-616-0885
This talk will describe this trend and its impact on families and caregivers. We will explore the religious and Scriptural sources for our concern about childbirth, and reflect on some of the social choices that have contributed to these cases.
Evening Keynote
Monday, June 19, 2017
5:30 p.m. Reception | 6 – 7 p.m. Lecture
UT Health Science Center | Pestana Lecture Hall 3.104A
7703 Floyd Curl | 210-567-0795
Explore the ethical issues of this trend and discuss the validity of different approaches to address the problem and the values that undergird possible solutions.

Our Speaker

Laurie Zoloth
Laurie Zoloth, PhD is Dean of the University of Chicago Divinity School. Zoloth also serves as a Charles McCormick Deering Professor of Teaching Excellence at Northwestern University, holding appointments in the Department of Religious Studies in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences and in the Feinberg School of Medicine. She has been the president of both the American Academy of Religion and the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities. She was the founding director of the Brady Program in Ethics and Civic Life at Weinberg College, a program which explored the connection between academic philosophy and the duties of citizenship. She was the founding director of the Center for Bioethics, Science, and Society at Feinberg School of Medicine, which addressed issues in emerging bioscience. In 2014 she was elected a Life Member at Clare Hall, University of Cambridge. She is the President of the Northwestern Faculty Senate.
In her capacity as a clinical bioethicist, she help to create the National Kaiser Permanente Bioethics committees and work for a decade at the East Bay Children’s Hospital. She has been a member of the NASA National Advisory Council, the nation’s highest civilian advisory board for NASA, for which she received the NASA Public Service Medal, the NASA Planetary Protection Advisory Committee. She was the founding chair of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Bioethics Advisory Board and served in that capacity for seven years. She was on the Executive Committee of the International Society for Stem Cell Research, as well as being on its founding board.  She has served on numerous NIH committees, including the International DSMB for AIDs research, study, and review committees and a DSMB for Minority Research. Zoloth has testified for NAS committees on stem cell research, mitochondrial research, and synthetic biology. She has been an elected Fellow of the Hastings Center since 2002. She currently serves on the National Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC), on the NASA Flight IACUC, and on the Harvard ESCRO for Stem Cell Research.

All behavior has a function. When we look through the sensory processing lens, we find many children with special needs display neurological differences in brain structure and function. They range in severity and can affect a person’s ability to take in, store, process and communicate information. Sensory processing difficulties play a big role in the success of children. When students become overwhelmed by big emotions it is our job to share our calm not to join their chaos.

This workshop provides education about sensory processing, executive function disorder, and functional results of learning disorders combined with practical tips you can use immediately in your work with children.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to describe sensory dysfunction and interception in everyday life of children with special needs.
  • Participants will list traits of executive function disorder in both thinking and doing skills.
  • Participants will choose activities and strategies for learning disorders and ADHD.
  • Participants will identify fun and functional activities to build independence with skills in all settings.

About the Speaker: Cara Koscinski, MOTOTR/L

Cara Koscinski, MOT, OTR/L, author of The Pocket Occupational Therapist Book Series, is a pediatric occupational therapist with over 20 years experience. She specializes in Sensory Processing Disorder, trauma-informed care, behavior advocacy, and autism. As a speaker, Cara brings her expertise as a pediatric occupational therapist and mother of two children with autism to parents, caregivers, families, and professionals. She has published six books which are sold globally and translated into many languages. Ms. Koscinski has her Master of Occupational Therapy degree and is currently attending school for her doctorate.

 

Pathways to Hope

On August 26 and 27, First Presbyterian Church’s Mental Hope Ministry and the San Antonio faith community will facilitate a ground-breaking, city-wide conference at the Tobin Center for the Performing Arts, to address mental health in our community.

For the first time, the faith community will join with the health care community, county agencies and officials, and broader San Antonio community to discuss this issue. The keynote speaker is Kay Warren, who along with her husband Pastor Rick Warren, founded Saddleback Church in Orange County, CA.

For more information or to register, attend, donate or volunteer, click here.

As the opioid crisis grows, Dr. Anna Lembke is exploring a deeper problem – the neurobiology of living in a dopamine-saturated world. The brain’s reward systems – while so necessary to survive from an evolutionary standpoint – may leave individuals susceptible to addiction in this modern world of plenty. With information coming at us from every direction, impacting the brain’s pleasure-pain balance, learning how to live in the world is one of the greatest challenges facing humans in next century. We all must learn to practice moderation, restraint and self-discipline in order to survive.

Dr. Lembke proposes that current day recovering addicts are already learning these skills. Is their experience in conquering addiction something we can all learn from?

Also join us for the evening keynote on Drug Dealer, MD, addressing the opioid crisis in America. Details.

Three out of four people addicted to heroin probably started on a prescription opioid, according to the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In the United States alone, 16,000 people die each year as a result of prescription opioid overdose. But perhaps the most frightening aspect of the prescription drug epidemic is that it’s built on well-meaning doctors treating patients with real problems.

In this Conversations About Ethics, Dr. Anna Lembke will uncover the unseen forces driving opioid addiction nationwide. Combining case studies from her own practice with vital statistics drawn from public policy, cultural anthropology, and neuroscience, she explores the complex relationship between doctors and patients, the science of addiction, and the barriers to successfully addressing drug dependence and addiction. Even when addiction is recognized by doctors and their patients, she argues, many doctors don’t know how to treat it, connections to treatment are lacking, and insurance companies won’t pay for rehab.

This conversation is for anyone whose life has been touched in some way by addiction to prescription drugs – whether those who have struggled personally or those who are providing care on the front lines. Dr. Lembke gives voice to the millions of Americans struggling with prescription drugs while singling out the real culprits behind the rise in opioid addiction: cultural narratives that promote pills as quick fixes, pharmaceutical corporations in cahoots with organized medicine, and a new medical bureaucracy focused on the bottom line that favors pills, procedures, and patient satisfaction over wellness. Dr. Lembke concludes that the prescription drug epidemic is a symptom of a faltering health care system, the solution for which lies in rethinking how health care is delivered.

Also join us for our luncheon keynote on Finding Balance in a Dopamine-Saturated World. Details.

Speaker:

Anna Lembke, MDAnna Lembke, MD, received her undergraduate degree in Humanities from Yale University and her medical degree from Stanford University School of Medicine. She completed a residency in Psychiatry, and a fellowship in mood disorders, both at Stanford, and is currently Associate Professor and Chief of the Stanford Addiction Medicine Dual Diagnosis Clinic. She has published over 50 peer-reviewed articles, chapters, and commentaries, and is author of the book: Drug Dealer, MD: How Doctors Were Duped, Patients Got Hooked, and Why It’s So Hard to Stop (Johns Hopkins University Press, November 2016).

 

Complex or developmental trauma can be overt or covert and are typically ongoing/repetitive. As such complex or developmental trauma should be addressed in stages, with neurobiologically-informed treatment.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to conceptualize what the meaning of “neurobiologically-informed treatment”.
  • Participants will be a able to describe the characteristics of complex and/or developmental trauma and be able to identify the neurobiological changes associated with complex trauma.
  • Participants will discuss the components of evidence based, relationally-focused, treatments and incorporate aspects of these treatments in their practice.
  • Participants will be able to determine the course of treatment course of action (frequency and length), based on assessment results and develop treatment plans that address the issues arising from complex trauma.

About the Speaker:

Franc Hudspeth, PhD, NCC, LPC-S, ACS, RPH, RPT-S, CPC,DDP-1, is the Associate Dean at Southern New Hampshire University. Franc is Editor of the International Journal of Play Therapy and the Journal of Counselor Preparation and Supervision as well. Franc also serves as President-Elect of the Association for Creativity and Counseling, Chair of the Association for Play Therapy’s Foundation Board of Directors. His writing/research interests include trauma’s impact on brain development, psychopharmacology, neuroscience influences on counseling, counselor’s military.

In an increasingly secular age, believers want their faith to matter, not just in life beyond the grave, but in this life, right now, each day, in all we do. Though we’re glad for the hope of heaven, we yearn for a faith that makes a difference in our daily lives and in a world desperate for God’s justice and peace.

One way faith can matter in the twenty-first century is through the integration of faith and work. Since most of us spend more than half of our waking lives at work, a faith that really matters must matter at work, no matter what we do.

The widespread yearning in this century for faith and work integration raises many questions for clergy. Is this popular desire something authentic Christianity can meaningfully address? If so, how and on what theological basis? In what ways will pastoral work be different in a time when members expect their faith to be relevant in workplaces that are often so different from churches? How are lay people essential partners in effective pastoral work?

The Rev. Dr. Mark D. Roberts will address these questions from the perspective of a Christian pastor and biblical scholar who is now directing a seminary leadership center. He will present a new vision for pastoral ministry that prepares congregants to experience a faith that matters, especially in the marketplace. Though focusing on a new pastoral paradigm, his message will also challenge and encourage those who, though not serving in official ecclesial roles, are deeply committed to the flourishing of religious communities and to forging a faith that matters in the twenty-first century.

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will see with greater clarity how much believers today want their faith to be relevant to their work.
  2. Participants will understand how the relationship of faith to all of life, including work, is grounded in the core theology of the Bible.
  3. Clergy participants will be encouraged to adopt a new paradigm for pastoral work, so they might better equip their congregants for integrating their faith with their work.
  4. Lay participants will recognize how essential they are if the church is to become an incubator of faith/work integration.
  5. Participants will be inspired by several stories illustrating how faith makes a difference in the workplace and in the wider world.

About the Speaker

After earning his Ph.D. in New Testament from Harvard University, the Rev. Dr. Mark D. Roberts spent twenty years as a parish pastor and an adjunct professor. Then, he served for seven years as Senior Director and Scholar-in-Residence for Laity Lodge, the Hill Country retreat center of the H.E. Butt Family Foundation. In 2015, he began as the Executive Director of the Max De Pree Center for Leadership at Fuller Seminary. Mark is the author of eight books, most recently a commentary on Ephesians published by Zondervan in the Story of God series. He is also a devotional writer, whose daily devotions, Life for Leaders, are emailed to more than 4,600 subscribers. You can learn more about Mark and his work at depree.org.

Mark is married to Linda Roberts, a marriage and family therapist, spiritual director, and executive coach. Mark and Linda have two children, both of whom graduated from Boerne Champion High School. Nathan is working on his Ph.D. in Film and Visual Studies at Harvard. Kara is teaching high school in California, while earning a master’s degree in education. Mark and Linda now reside in Pasadena, California. They have fond memories of their seven years in the San Antonio area.

 

Registration will open soon!

Child Parent Relationship Training (CPRT)
Give your children what they need most: YOU

In this 10 week course, you will learn how your child may benefit from Play Therapy. Receive hands-on training and see how to incorporate Play Therapy into your own family.

When children have problems, sometimes they don’t have the words to talk about them. Play gives children a way to communicate feelings they don’t understand or can’t express any other way.

Play therapy has been shown to be an effective intervention with children for a variety of behavioral and emotional difficulties. Research has shown that motivated parents can be trained to be as effective as play therapists using play therapy skills with their own children.

NOTE: Class 1 lasts two and a half hours. Classes 2-10 are 2 hours in length.

Cost is $50 per individual or $75 per couple
(includes all 10 sessions)

To Register or for if you have questions, please contact The Center. Nancy Franklin, LCSW, ACSW, Registered Play Therapist and Supervisor 210. 616.0885 (x209)

Lunch and Learn – bring your own lunch

Title: It’s Not Easy Being Green – Exploring the Personal & Archetypal Symbol

Summary: Green is a color rich in meaning. As springtime begins to re-green our world, lets take a moment to explore the color itself, its origins, its social metaphors, and finally, its personal impact on our lives.

Objectives:

  1. Participants will become familiar with both the physical qualities of the color green as well as its wide variety of cultural, metaphorical, and archetypal qualities.
  2. Participants will experience art tasks designed to enrich their understanding of the color green.
  3. Participants will engage in a group art task designed to commemorate this sometimes mundane, but in this case, rejuvenating

About the Speaker:

Vicki Williams-Patterson, MCAT, ATR-BC, LP-AT

Vicki Williams-Patterson is a Board Certified Art Therapist and a Licensed Professional Counselor. She has worked as an art therapist since 1983. Her graduate education at Hahnemann University was strongly rooted in developmental psychology and psychodynamic theory, and she has continued with that orientation. Since 1990, she has been conducting seminars on the therapeutic uses of art in the counseling process at local, regional and national conferences.  Since receiving her graduate degree in Art Therapy, she has engaged in advanced professional training in the areas of trauma recovery, Jungian psychology, and Sand Tray Process. In November 2009 she received the American Art Therapy Association’s Annual Award for Clinical Services. She is the past President of the Texas Mental Health Counselors Association, a division of the Texas Counseling Association.

 

Join us September 18 as we present Judy Collins, Grammy Award winner, artist, songwriter, and public speaker as our 2018 Legacy of Hope Luncheon speaker. She has seen years of fame, and dealt with the stresses that go along with life in the spotlight. Having faced her son’s suicide and battles with bulimia, alcoholism, and more, Collins now travels the U.S. to offer comfort to other survivors whose lives have been affected by mental illness.

Summary: Our efforts at the beginning of a counseling relationship are intense as well as time consuming. Counselors are asked to consider their clients’ culture as well as their history, physical condition, and relationships. In the process of assessment, we often discover social conditions that can derail our efforts as counselors. Hunger, abuse, discrimination, homelessness, poverty, lack of transportation, and violence are real factors in our clients’ lives. Not only do these conditions influence our clients’ mental health, they can actually be the cause mental illness. We can refer our clients to resources, but often their situation is so dire that they are unable to access those resources. On our own time, we can take action to address the troubles in our society, but what if there were a way to take social action within the counseling relationship? In this workshop, we will begin to explore how art-making can facilitate the bringing of social action into the counseling process.

Objectives:

  1. Participants will become familiar with social action as both an internal and external event.
  2. Participants will experience art tasks designed to raise their awareness of the need for social action within themselves.

Participants will experience art tasks designed to develop a sense of self-worth and empowerment within their clients.

Speaker: 

Vicki Williams-Patterson, MCAT, ATR-BC, LP-AT

COUNSELOR & ART THERAPIST

Consulting Art Therapist & Open Studio Facilitator

Vicki Williams-Patterson is a Board Certified Art Therapist and a Licensed Professional Counselor. She has worked as an art therapist since 1983. Her graduate education at Hahnemann University was strongly rooted in developmental psychology and psychodynamic theory, and she has continued with that orientation. Since 1990, she has been conducting seminars on the therapeutic uses of art in the counseling process at local, regional and national conferences.  Since receiving her graduate degree in Art Therapy, she has engaged in advanced professional training in the areas of trauma recovery, Jungian psychology, and Sand Tray Process. In November 2009 she received the American Art Therapy Association’s Annual Award for Clinical Services. She is the past President of the Texas Mental Health Counselors Association, a division of the Texas Counseling Association.

Summary

This program will provide an overview and discussion of state and federal laws, rules and regulations that govern the practice of mental health and play therapy professionals.  The presentation will discuss Texas confidentiality statutes, the privacy regulations under the federal Health Insurance Privacy and Portability Act (HIPAA) and recent amendments to Texas Family Code, Chapter 107 regarding Social Studies in family law cases. The program will review recent rule updates by the LPC, LMFT, Social Worker and Psychology Boards and discuss changes that may be required to ensure compliance.  There will be specific instruction on responding to requests for mental health records, including requests from clients and subpoenas, and appropriate testimony in court by a treating mental health professional who is subpoenaed to a hearing or deposition. The program will review legal requirements for documenting mental health services and highlight best practices for improving the quality of records.  Finally, this program will review the most common sources for Board complaints against mental health professionals and provide practical strategies for protecting a professional’s license and livelihood.

Learning Objectives

  1. Review Texas privacy statutes and recent amendments to the federal HIPAA privacy regulations and understand how these recent amendments impact mental health and play therapy practices and what actions are required to remain in compliance with state and federal law.
  2. Understand recent amendments to the LPC, LMFT, Social Worker and Psychology Board Rules with special emphasis on how the rules apply to real world situations and a highlight of changes that may be needed to ensure that a professional’s mental health and/or play therapy practice is in compliance with applicable Board rules.
  3. Review basic requirements for documentation of mental health and play therapy services as required by various Board rules and program requirements, and learn specific techniques to improve the quality of mental health records.
  4. Review amendments to Chapter 107 of the Texas Family Code regarding social studies, and the expected impact of these amendments on mental health and play therapy professionals who treat children, adults and families involved in Suits Affecting the Parent-Child Relationship (SAPCR).
  5. Discuss the appropriate scope of testimony for mental health and play therapy professionals in a Suit Affecting the Parent-Child Relationship (SAPCR).
  6. Review the areas of a mental health and play therapy practice that are most likely to lead to Board complaints and what steps can be taken to protect a professional license and avoid the conflicts that often lead to complaints.
  7. Review the complaint, investigation and disciplinary process for mental health boards in Texas.

Our Speaker

Kenda Dalrymple is a Partner in the firm of Carls, McDonald & Dalrymple, L.L.P. in Austin, Texas.  She earned her B.A. in Communications from Baylor University and her law degree from Baylor University School of Law.  She practices in the areas of administrative and health law, with an emphasis on representing licensed professionals before their licensing boards and advising them on matters related to their practices.  She is married to her college sweetheart, Bill Dalrymple, and they live in Cedar Park with their daughter Erin and three dogs.

This workshop is intended to provide advanced play therapists a cursory understanding of Jungian Analytical Play Therapy with the intention to provide them with a relevant model and structure by which they can deepen their understanding of children’s therapeutic play.

Learning Objectives

Participants will:

  1. Gain a clear understanding of the development of a child’s psyche
  2. Gain a clear understanding of the development of a complex and proto-complex
  3. Gain a clear understanding of the archetypal material involved in complex formation
  4. Gain a clear understanding of the symbolic nature of toys
  5. Gain a clear understanding of the connection between the thematic application of the toys and the child’s complex related issues
  6. Gain an understanding of a child’s work and the process of transformation
  7. Gain an understanding of the therapist’s role as witness, container, and interpreter

Speaker

JP Lilly is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Registered Play Therapist/ Supervisor in private practice. He is published in books and journals, and taught at Brigham Young University in the graduate schools of Clinical Psychology, Social Work, and MFT for seventeen years.

All behavior has a function. When we look through the sensory processing lens, we find many children struggle with effective processing of information around them. Optimal function of our bodies occurs when our sensory and motor systems are strong and able to adapt to the demands of the environment. Today’s children often struggle with fidgeting, decreased attention, and immature motor patterns which manifest themselves through frustration, decreased functional skills, and behavior issues. When our body’s systems are not integrated to form a strong foundation, difficulties in many areas occur. This session provides education about using movement and sensory integrative techniques to improve overall function with practical tips you can use immediately in your work with children.

At the end of this workshop,

  • Participants will be able to describe how sensory processing disorder and the eight sensory systems affect everyday life at both school and home.
  • Participants will realize that behavior and anxiety are forms of communication when a child is dysregulated.
  • Participants will identify fun and functional sensory-motor experiences to build new sensory pathways and improve comfort in daily living.

About the Speaker: Cara Koscinski, MOTOTR/L

Cara Koscinski, MOT, OTR/L, author of The Pocket Occupational Therapist Book Series, is a pediatric occupational therapist with over 20 years experience. She specializes in Sensory Processing Disorder, trauma-informed care, behavior, YOGA, and autism. As a speaker, Cara brings her expertise as a pediatric occupational therapist and mother of two children with autism to parents and professionals. She has published six books which are sold globally and translated into many languages. Ms. Koscinski has her Master of Occupational Therapy degree and is currently attending school for her doctorate. She is the OT advisor for Autism, Asperger’s Digest Magazine and Asperkids.

Many of us struggle with fear, worry, and anxiety. We are faced with personal concerns, upsetting life events, daily worries, fear about those we love, or larger ongoing fears in these challenging times. This daylong workshop invites us to learn new ways to relate to fear and anxiety. We will learn how to be mindful in the midst of fear, and how to use mindfulness to prevent our thoughts from getting out of control, by returning to the present moment. We will also learn to cultivate states of mind that antidote these emotions such as fearlessness, ease, and kindness. The workshop will be experiential, and include periods of silent mindfulness meditation practice. We will also be exposed to some basic mindfulness tools that we can share with our clients and patients. Dress comfortably!

Special Morning Guest: Judy Collins, Grammy Award winning singer/songwriter and longtime mental health advocate will stop by for a few minutes in the morning before The Center’s Legacy of Hope Luncheon to share her personal story. During her 50-plus years in the spotlight, Collins battled bulimia, alcoholism, addiction, and survived her own attempt at suicide. In 1992, she was forced to deal with the suicide death of 33-year-old son, Clark. 

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will be able to experience the basics of mindfulness meditation for their personal use
  2. Participants will be able to apply mindfulness approaches, tools, and techniques directly to help with anxious thoughts and emotions
  3. Participants will be able to demonstrate and share with clients, patients, and students some basic mindfulness tools for working with anxiety

About the Speaker

Diana Winston is the Director of Mindfulness Education at UCLA’s Mindful Awareness Research Center (MARC) and the co-author, with Susan Smalley PhD, of Fully Present, the Science, Art and Practice of Mindfulness She has taught mindfulness for health and well-being since 1993 in a variety of settings including in healthcare, universities, businesses, non-profits, and schools in the US and internationally. Her work has been mentioned in the New York Times, O Magazine, Newsweek, the Los Angeles Times, Allure, Women’s Health, among others. She created the evidence-based Mindful Awareness Practices Program (MAPs), founded UCLA’s Training in Mindfulness Facilitation, and is a founding board member of the International Mindfulness Teachers Association. The LA Times calls one of the nation’s best-known teachers of mindfulness.” Www.marc.ucla.edu and www.dianawinston.com

Elizabeth Smart was just 14 years old when she was kidnapped at knifepoint. What followed was a brutal, traumatic 9 month nightmare. Elizabeth Smart will talk about how she survived and her secret to forging a new life.

Join us on September 30th at the San Antonio Country Club.

Summary

The Art of Perception, an innovative professional development program, teaches participants to view and analyze works of art as a vehicle to enhance their observation, perception, and communication skills.  In this highly participatory workshop, individuals reconsider the skills they use to fulfill their responsibilities, and revisit their ability to communicate concisely and effectively in a variety of scenarios. Originally developed to help medical professionals improve observation and communication skills with patients, the program has been adapted for training of law enforcement (FBI, NYPD, and Department of Justice), education, religious, and industry professionals across the country.  In addition to addressing the role of non-verbal communication and how it relates to work with clients and constituents, art and photography are used as tools to consider bias, prejudice and related ethical issues.  The Art of Perception channels the power of art into a relevant and sustainable initiative that enhances and enriches our innate ability to discern and communicate information effectively and accurately.

Learning Objectives

Participants will

  • enhance observation and perception skills and communicate inferences more effectively
  • learn an inquiry model to assessing a situation
  • understand the differences between observation and perception
  • be able to articulate observations based on confirmable data (visual or otherwise) and formulate a nexus between inferences based upon the perceptions and those confirmable observations.

Our Speaker

Amy E. Herman designed, developed and conducts all sessions of The Art of Perception using the analysis of works of art to improve perception and communication skills. Originally designed in 2000 to help medical students improve their observation and communication skills with patients, the program was subsequently adapted for law enforcement professionals and leaders in industry, education, the intelligence community, and finance. She currently conducts the program nationally for a wide range of law enforcement agencies including the New York City Police Department, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Department of Defense, the State Department, and the Department of Justice as well as for hospitals, medical schools, and first responders. Ms. Herman’s book, Visual Intelligence will be published in May 2016.  Ms. Herman holds an AB in International Affairs, a Juris Doctor, and an MA in Art History.

A decade ago, The Ecumenical Center embarked on a program to increase and encourage the growth of an extraordinary ethical business community in San Antonio. Since then, local business leaders have partnered with students from The University of Texas at San Antonio, St. Mary’s University, Trinity University, and the University of the Incarnate Word to identify excellence in ethical business practices.

We invite you to join us for the annual Ethics in Business San Antonio (EIBSA) Luncheon on Wednesday, May 23, at the San Antonio Country Club from 11:30 a.m to 1:00 p.m. Our keynote speaker will be prominent business Mr. J. Kuper.

In addition to recognizing excellence in organizations, The Lahourcade Award is presented at the luncheon to an individual or group that has demonstrated high integrity and ethical decision-making. This year’s award will go to Mrs. Kathleen Kuper from Kuper Sotheby’s International Realty whose commitment to ethics in business knows no bounds.

Proceeds for the event support the education, counseling, and wellness programs at The Center, which is dedicated to healing and growth in our community.

If you would like to attend the event, have questions, or need additional information, please register here or contact Lejla Cenanovic at lcenanovic@ecrh.org or call 210.616.0885.

A special thanks to Mrs. Maray Carter Chair of the EISBA Luncheon, and Mr. John Weber, EIBSA Steering Committee Chairman, for his commitment to the program.

Summary

This workshop will explore evidence for using mindfulness techniques to treat anxiety and depression. Participants will explore three mindfulness techniques to apply to work with clients experiencing depression and anxiety.

This is a bring-your-own brown bag lunch. The Center will provide drinks.

Objectives

Participants will be better able to

  1. Identify the definition of mindfulness and what practices develop mindfulness
  2.  Discuss use of mindfulness practices in the treatment of anxiety and depression
  3. Describe and apply at least 3 mindfulness practices to help clients experiencing with anxiety and depression

About the Speaker

Salina Shelton, LPC, MA specializes in individual and group therapy. Among her areas of expertise are chronic pain, grief, depression, anxiety, and career counseling. She presents workshops on the topics of Art Therapy, Grief, and Innovation.

Play as a source of joy, is a natural tool for healing trauma. Although Western cultures often view play as an amusement or even a waste of time, relational play is actually an important avenue for building resilient and flexible nervous systems.
Play therapy activities serve as neural exercises helping a person to develop skills of transitioning quickly from states of over arousal or under arousal back to the calm of safe connection after environmental challenges are met. Traumatic experiences often diminish this flexibility.
Join Theresa Kestly, PhD for a day of hands on activity using case materials to experience and articulate the resilience building and healing benefits of play.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to describe how sand tray and play therapy activities serve as neural exercises to create flexible nervous systems that help to heal trauma in play therapy context.
  • Participants will identify the three branches of the polyvagal nervous system that are visible during sand tray and other play therapy activities.
  • Participants will learn to explain to another person how the nervous system works during play therapy using the traffic light analogy of Stephen Porges.
  • Participants will identify at least three of seven motivational-emotional systems in the brain.
  • Participants will be able to describe one way that sand tray play therapy provides the safety that is required to heal trauma from an interpersonal neurobiology perspective.
  • Participants will discuss a researcher who has provided scientific evidence for the role of play in healing trauma and building resilience.

About the Speaker:

Theresa Kestly, PhD is a clinical psychologist, educator, consultant and a registered play therapist/supervisor. She is author of The Interpersonal Neurobiology of Play: Brain-Building Interventions for Well-Being, part of the Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology. In her private practice in Corrales, New Mexico, she specializes in play therapy and sand tray therapy with children, adults, families and couples. Theresa has worked with Native Americans over a number of years as a teacher and consultant. She is past president of the New Mexico Association for Play Therapy, and she is the founder and director of the Sand Tay Training Institute of New Mexico in Corrales, New Mexico.

If you’re a chaplain or approved candidate with a police department, sheriff’s office or other law enforcement agency, no one is better positioned than you to be a positive link between law enforcement and the community at large. That’s why The Ecumenical Center invites you to attend our exclusive Chaplains for Justice Training Program.

Developed in collaboration between The Center and various local and regional law enforcement agencies, this program provides a path to certification in chaplaincy and pastoral counseling.

This pilot program is open to law enforcement chaplains and approved chaplain candidates – and offers you:

  • An avenue for certification in chaplaincy and pastoral counseling.
  • One unit of CPE credit (classroom, supervised clinical hours, group and individual supervision).
  • Full accreditation by The College of Pastoral Supervision and Psychotherapy (CPSP), New York.

A decade ago, The Ecumenical Center embarked on a program grounded in three core beliefs:

  • Good ethics lead to healthy businesses.
  • Healthy businesses lead to healthy people.
  • Healthy people lead to healthy communities.

Since then, local business leaders have partnered with students from The University of Texas at San Antonio, St. Mary’s University, Trinity University, and the University of the Incarnate Word to identify excellence in ethical business practices.

We invite you to join us for the annual Ethics in Business San Antonio (EIBSA) Luncheon on Wednesday, May 23, at the San Antonio Country Club, beginning at 11:30 a.m. This unique program brings together students and local business leaders, making this an extraordinary experience and an opportunity to highlight the importance of business ethics. Past individuals include outstanding business leaders such as Mr. Kevin Moriarti, Mr. Dick Evans, Mr. & Mrs. George Wenglein, and the Cavender Family.

In addition to recognizing excellence in organizations, The Lahourcade Award is presented at the luncheon to an individual or group that has demonstrated high integrity and ethical decision-making. We are pleased to announce that the 2018 recipient of this honor is Kathleen Kuper of Kuper Sotheby’s International Realty.

Our keynote speaker will be well-respected business leader Mr. J. Kuper.

Proceeds for the event support the education, counseling, and wellness programs at The Center, which is dedicated to healing and growth in our community. The Center served more than 24,000 individuals, 12,000 of which were children children, families, educators, counselors, and pastors in 2017.

If you have questions, need additional information, or would like to attend the event please contact Mary Beth Fisk at 210.616.0885.

More details coming soon!

Speaker

Diana Winston is the Director of Mindfulness Education at MARC and has been teaching mindfulness since 1993. She is the co-author (with Susan Smalley, Ph.D.) of Fully Present: The Science, Art, and Practice of Mindfulness (2010). She has brought mindful awareness into schools, hospitals, and nonprofits, as well as to adolescents, seniors, leaders, teachers, activists, and health professionals in the US and Asia. She is also the author of Wide Awake: A Buddhist Guide for Teens (2003) and the CD, “Mindful Meditations.” Diana is also a member of the teacher’s council at Spirit Rock Meditation Center in California. She spent a year as a Buddhist nun in Burma and has been practicing mindfulness meditation since 1989.

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly rhythm making the session.

Every First Saturday:

10am-11:30am

Therapeutic Rhythm making sessions are open to anyone, so bring along the whole family. No experience is necessary.

Expressive therapeutic rhythm making can have many benefits, such as:

  • Accelerating physical healing and boosting your immune system.
  • Feeling more connected with others.
  • Feeling of well-being.
  • Relieving emotional trauma.
  • Reducing Stress.

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 6

February 3

March 3

April 7

May 5

June 2

July 7

August 4

September 1

October 6

November 3

December 1

Additional details coming soon!

Speaker

Renee Turner, Ph.D., LPC-S, RPT-S is a Licensed Professional Counselor-Supervisor, Registered Play Therapy Supervisor, and a certified Integral Breath Therapy trainer.  Renee also has advanced training in EMDR, Somatic Experiencing, Hypnotherapy, and other mind-body practices and expressive modalities.  She is currently an assistant professor at UMHB and the proud mom of one.

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly rhythm making session.

Every First Saturday:

10am-11:30am

Therapeutic Rhythm making sessions are open to anyone, so bring along the whole family. No experience is necessary.

Expressive therapeutic rhythm making can have many benefits, such as:

  • Accelerating physical healing and boosting your immune system.
  • Feeling more connected with others.
  • Feeling of well-being.
  • Relieving emotional trauma.
  • Reducing Stress.

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 6

February 3

March 3

April 7

May 5

June 2

July 7

August 4

September 1

October 6

November 3

December 1

2018 marks the 300th anniversary of the founding of San Antonio. All throughout the city, organizations will be holding events celebrating the culture and heritage that make San Antonio great.

For our own celebration, The Center is working in coordination with the SA300 committee for Art Heals Hearts, an exhibition of art, music, and poetry made by clients and professionals alike.

Through artistic expression, people find healing, growth, and wellness. In this spirit, we invite you to join us and experience original art pieces that illustrate individuals’ – and the city’s – journeys through the last 300 years.

RSVP to Lcenanovic@ecrh.org, or call 210.616.0885. The event is free and open to the public.

Summary

Drawing from America Bracho’s experience at Latina Health Access, people are experts in their lives, and we are obligated to creating mechanisms for them to help themselves and help others. Ethical principles of respect, inclusion and self-determination are at the core of these views.

Promotores programs can be designed to increase the benefit of self-help and mutual help activities, assuring at the same time that participants are connected with other groups and services as needed.

Participants in the workshop will become familiar with the specific role promotores have not only in helping other individuals but also in improving community conditions, fighting for social justice and equity to create environments for children and adults can grow up with safety, emotional wellness and opportunities to thrive.

During this workshop participants will have the opportunity to reflect on the following questions: Who owns the right to talk about one’s mental health? Do community members need to have a degree to support their own mental health and that of  their neighbors and communities? Why does the health field focus so much people’s problems and so little on people’s strengths? Why do people prefer not to talk about mental illness? Why is it important to include community members as community health workers (promotores) particularly those affected by emotional or mental health problems in supporting others with similar issues or in similar circumstances? Why is it essential to focus on strength based model?

How can we train and coach promotores/CHWs in ways that respect and honor their wisdom while simultaneously increasing their ability to have an impact on and benefit others? How do we help promotores/CHWs to recognize the need to refer and connect participants with other groups and providers and to do it appropriately?

Learning Objectives

  1. Articulate three reasons why including individuals affected by emotional health issues as part of the mental health team makes programmatic sense and honors the ethical principles of respect, inclusion and self-determination.
  2. Describe how promotores/CHWs can increase their ability to help and provide benefits to their peers affected by emotional and mental health issues by using their wisdom and experience and receiving appropriate training and coaching on these matters. Describe how this practice honors the ethical principles of benefit and do no harm.
  3. Discuss the potential professional barriers to working with promotores including those related to liability; boundaries, power/authority and the ethical principle of do no harm and how best practices in the recruitment, training and supervision of community workers could help remove those barriers.

Our Speaker

Leading Public Health expert, America Bracho, MD, MPH, is the Executive Director of Latino Health Access, a center for health promotion and disease prevention located in Santa Ana, California. This Center was created under her leadership to assist with the multiple health needs of Latinos in Orange County.

Latino Health Access facilitates mechanisms of empowerment for the Latino community and uses participatory approaches to community health education. The programs train community health workers as leaders of wellness and change. Ms. Bracho worked as a physician in her native Venezuela for several years, after which she came to the U.S. to obtain a Master’s Degree in Public Health at the University of Michigan. Her Public Health specialty is Health Education and Health Behavior.

Healing takes place best in the context of a relationship. Whether it’s within one’s self, one on one, a small group, a neighborhood, a nation, or the world; when people have a sense of connection with others, they are empowered to work together for positive change. Art-making can be a powerful process for facilitating connections in both small & very large communities. In this workshop, you will learn several art techniques that will enrich relationships through a stronger sense of connection & set the stage for energetic healthy change!

Speaker: Vicki Williams-Patterson, LPC-AT

Note: This is a bring-your-own brown bag lunch. The Center will provide drinks.

 

Summary

In this presentation leading public health expert, America Bracho, will discuss the elements of this model and how it offers mechanisms for individual inclusion and community participation in respectful ways that honor their right to self-determination, justice, tangible benefits, and to contribute to solutions to the problems that have an impact on their health and wellness.

Dr. Bracho will share how promotoras are trained to deliver quality services to assure benefits to the community and to be  aware of their boundaries not only with other health care providers but also in the interactions with the individuals they are helping.

In addition, this presentation will address how to include and interact with promotoras and community in the health team in ways that contribute to improving the connection with participants, increases cultural competency, increases health literacy, improves health outcomes, addresses root causes of disease and despair and makes the strategy relevant, all within principles of inclusion/participation, equity, benefit/quality, solidarity and social justice..

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe how the promotor model addresses the respectful inclusion of individuals and communities to improve their health with an equity lens and aligned with the ethical principles of inclusion and self-determination.
  2. Discuss the training and supervision practices that  assure that the inclusion of promotores in the team will translate into quality and tangible health benefits to individuals and communities.
  3. Discuss how to include promotores and communities in our institutions in ways that assure that their voices can be heard, their wisdom included and their time compensated in ways that are aligned with ethical principles of respect and justice.

Our Speaker

Leading Public Health expert, America Bracho, MD, MPH, is the Executive Director of Latino Health Access, a center for health promotion and disease prevention located in Santa Ana, California. This Center was created under her leadership to assist with the multiple health needs of Latinos in Orange County.

Latino Health Access facilitates mechanisms of empowerment for the Latino community and uses participatory approaches to community health education. The programs train community health workers as leaders of wellness and change. Ms. Bracho worked as a physician in her native Venezuela for several years, after which she came to the U.S. to obtain a Master’s Degree in Public Health at the University of Michigan. Her Public Health specialty is Health Education and Health Behavior.

Objectives:

– Provide overview of the FBI’s Victim Assistance Response Team in Mass Casualty incidents

– Discuss the impact of traumatic events on children and developmentally appropriate reactions and responses.

– Discuss evidence-based models for early intervention

– Discuss lessons learned in responding to children and families

 

About the Speaker:

Melissa Snow is the Child Victim Program Coordinator for the FBI, Victim Services Division. Currently she serves as a subject matter expert

on child trauma, adolescent brain development and best practices in responding and serving child/adolescent victims of crime. She also

serves on the FBI Victim Services Response Team (VSRT), a rapid deployment team which specializes in response to terrorism and mass

casualty incidents. Prior to joining the FBI, Melissa spent nearly 15 years provide advocacy, direct services and resource development for

survivors of child exploitation. Within that role she worked as the Child Sex Trafficking Specialist for the National Center for Missing &

Exploited Children (NCMEC). Melissa also founded and operated the Anti-Human Trafficking Program at TurnAround, a non-profit in

Baltimore, Maryland and is the former Director of Programs at Shared Hope International.

About this Event

Monday, Oct. 5, 2020: “Conversations About Ethics” featuring Dr. Rita Nakashima Brock, Senior Vice President for Moral Injury Programs at Volunteers of America

Two free virtual events

  • 11:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. CDT:“What Makes Us Moral? Morality, Trauma and Moral Injury
  • 7:00-8:30 p.m. CDT: Moral Injury and Its Challenges to Current Mental Health Models

In traumatic or stressful moments, individuals may act – or witness others acting – in ways that violate deeply held moral beliefs. This can cause “moral injury,” resulting in suffering due to emotions such as shame, guilt, remorse, outrage, despair, mistrust and self-isolation. Much research has focused on military service members or veterans, but studies also have identified moral injury among health care workers and others. This has particular relevance in a health care crisis when clinicians may face tough ethical decisions about triage and resource allocation.

 

with Vicki Williams Patterson

Life moves us through many cycles, transitioning from one stage of growth to another. This experiential workshop will explore psychological growth as a cycle. Different challenges at various stages and questions encountered at each stage will also be explored.

Specific Learning Objectives
Participants will be able to:
  • Describe psychological growth as a cycle
  • Describe challenges at various stages of the cycle
  • Engage in art intervention to explore personal psychological growth

Speaker
Salina Shelton, LPC  specializes in individual and group therapy. Among her areas of expertise are chronic pain, grief, depression, anxiety, and career counseling. She presents workshops on the topics of Art Therapy, Grief, and Innovation.

Note: This is a bring-your-own brown bag lunch. The Center will provide drinks.

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Open Art Studio Session. A wonderful opportunity for people of all ages (6-106) to use art materials in a playful manner in a relaxed setting.

To reserve a seat, please email Vlwpatrbc@gmail.com or call Lejla Cenanovic at The Center (210) 616-0885.

Every Fourth Saturday:

10:00am-1:00pm

Aggressive lashing out, whether it’s in cyber space or in the school hallways, is a destructive force that can destroy the learning environment. Art-making can provide a means for anger & violence to be expressed, shared, and transformed into positive energy for change. In this extended workshop, we will explore art-making experiences that can help transform a hostile environment into an energetic atmosphere for creative change.

 

Speaker: Vicki Williams-Patterson, LPC-AT

Note: This is a bring-your-own brown bag lunch. The Center will provide drinks.


Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Open Art Studio Session. A wonderful opportunity for people of all ages (6-106) to use art materials in a playful manner in a relaxed setting.

To reserve a seat, please email Vlwpatrbc@gmail.com or call Lejla Cenanovic at The Center (210) 616-0885.

Every Fourth Saturday:

10:00am-1:00pm

This program will provide an overview and discussion of state and federal laws, rules and regulations that govern the practice of a mental health professional. The presentation will discuss Texas confidentiality statutes, the privacy regulations under the federal Health Insurance Privacy and Portability Act (HIPAA) and recent amendments to Texas Family Code, Chapter 107 regarding child custody evaluations in family law cases and how to testify in court. The program will review recent rule updates by the LPC, LMFT, Social Worker and Psychology Boards and discuss changes that may be required to ensure compliance.

Learning Objectives

  1. Review Texas privacy statutes and recent amendments to the federal HIPAA privacy regulations and understand how these recent amendments impact a mental health practice and what actions are required to remain in compliance with state and federal law.
  2. Understand recent amendments to the LPC, LMFT, Social Worker and Psychology Board Rules with special emphasis on how the rules apply to real world situations and a highlight of changes that may be needed to ensure that a professional’s mental health practice is in compliance with applicable Board rules.
  3. Review the areas of a mental health practice that are most likely to lead to Board complaints and what steps can be taken to protect a professional license and avoid the conflicts that often lead to complaints.
  4. Review the complaint, investigation and disciplinary process for mental health boards in Texas.

Speaker

Kenda Dalrymple is a Partner in the firm ofCarls, McDonald & Dalrymple, L.L.P. in Austin, Texas. She earned her B.A. in Communications from Baylor University and her law degree from Baylor University School of Law. She practices in the areas of administrative and health law, with an emphasis on representing licensed professionals before their licensing boards and advising them on matters related to their practices. She is married to her college sweetheart, Bill Dalrymple, and they live in Cedar Park where they cater to the whims of four dogs.

Mariel Hemingway. Ernest Hemingway’s granddaughter. Academy Award nominee. Prolific author. Mariel talks about how she survived and thrived despite her family’s struggle with mental illness, alcohol, suicide and abuse.

What is it with all these Zombies? It’s not just Hollywood movies – they have their own TV shows, local parades, and handbooks! Every Halloween, at least a few kids put on green make-up, fit a plastic cleaver into their heads, and stumble out their doors to collect candy. What’s going on? In this workshop, we will delve into this persistent and somewhat bizarre message from the collective unconscious. We might as well try to understand them, because they aren’t going away!

Speaker: Vicki Williams-Patterson, LPC-AT

Note: This is a bring-your-own brown bag lunch. The Center will provide drinks.

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Open Art Studio Session. A wonderful opportunity for people of all ages (6-106) to use art materials in a playful manner in a relaxed setting.

To reserve a seat, please email Vlwpatrbc@gmail.com or call Lejla Cenanovic at The Center (210) 616-0885.

Every Fourth Saturday:

10:00am-1:00pm

Presented by The Center’s counselors and staff.

This workshop is for professional counselors and psychotherapists working with the medical, physical, vocational, behavioral, psychosocial, and mental health aspects of active duty, veterans, veterans with disabilities, and family members.

The goals for the day’s workshop is to help professional caregivers:

  • Assess military mental health, wellness, psychosocial aspects, and career needs of those personnel transitioning from military to civilian life.
  • Develop a therapeutic working alliance for the purpose of understanding the military culture and within-group differences.
  • Apply treatment planning and strategies for increasing the mental, physical, and spiritual well-being across all areas of psychosocial and occupational functioning.
  • Discuss critical medical and psychosocial adjustment aspects of chronic illness and disability that most affect military populations.
  • Identify psychosocial adjustment needs within the deployment cycle.
  • Develop treatment strategies for combat-related post-traumatic stress symptoms, moral injury, substance use disorders, and other major mental health and psychological concerns.
  • Recognize marriage and family issues of concern within the military community.
  • Apply specific psychosocial and career transition approaches from active duty to civilian life.
  • Cultivate resiliency, coping, and post-traumatic growth across the military life-span.
  • Synthesize best practices for optimal mental health and well-being of active duty service members, veterans, and their family members.

About the Speaker

Mark A. Stebnicki, Ph.D., LPC, DCMHS, CRC, CCM, CCMC is a Professor and Coordinator of the Military and Trauma Counseling Certificate Program in the Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC. He is an active teacher, researcher, and psychotherapy practitioner who has over 25 years of working with the medical, psychosocial, vocational, and mental health aspects of those exposed to extraordinary stressful and trauma events, as well as chronic illnesses and disabilities. He has written over 28 journal articles, 8 books, and has presented at over 100 national, state, regional conferences and seminars.

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Open Art Studio Session. A wonderful opportunity for people of all ages (6-106) to use art materials in a playful manner in a relaxed setting.

To reserve a seat, please email Vlwpatrbc@gmail.com or call Lejla Cenanovic at The Center (210) 616-0885.

Every Fourth Saturday:

10:00am-1:00pm

Working in the dark, finding the light

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Open Art Studio Session. A wonderful opportunity for people of all ages (6-106) to use art materials in a playful manner in a relaxed setting.

To reserve a seat, please email Vlwpatrbc@gmail.com or call Lejla Cenanovic at The Center (210) 616-0885.

Every Fourth Saturday:

10:00am-1:00pm

Research has uncovered trauma as a core public health concern facing our nation, linking experiences of trauma to mental health conditions, substance use concerns, and chronic physical health problems. A growing body of evidence has found that experiencing the trauma of intimate partner violence (IPV) often poses additional challenges to safely accessing care, without fear or threats to personal wellbeing, and can cause as well as exacerbate physical and behavioral health conditions. At the same time, many of our organizations are unprepared to meet the unique needs of survivors of trauma and/or IPV, creating unnecessary barriers to effective care. Ethical practice requires providers and organizations to recognize the effects of traumatic stress in clients as well as institutions, while cultivating multi-dimensional responses to address trauma and prevent re-traumatization. This interactive session will provide foundational information on trauma and IPV-informed approaches to care, including practice-level and system-level strategies for improving access to effective services for survivors.

Join Gabriela Zapata-Alma, LCSW, CADC for a full-day interactive workshop on Cultivating Trauma-informed Approaches and Organizations: An Ethical Imperative.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify at least five signs and/or effects of trauma.
  • Contextualize symptoms and/or risk behaviors as coping responses that aid in self-protection and survival for survivors of IPV and other trauma.
  • Describe at least four core components of trauma-informed approaches to care.
  • Identify at least four strategies to reduce the risk of client re-traumatization and staff secondary trauma.
  • Create a plan for increasing trauma-informed and IPV-informed practice, including areas of strength as well as areas of growth within clinical care and program environments.
About Our Speaker

 

Gabriela Zapata-Alma, LCSW, CADC, is the Director of Policy and Practice for Domestic Violence and Substance Use at the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health, as well as faculty at The University of Chicago, where they coordinate the Advanced Alcohol and Other Drug Counselor certification program at the School of Social Service Administration.

Gabriela brings over 15 years of experience supporting people impacted by abuse, violence, trauma, substance use disorders, mental health conditions, housing instability, and HIV/AIDS; providing counseling, training, advocacy, and policy consultation; and leading programs using trauma-informed approaches, Motivational Interviewing, harm reduction, gender-responsive care, Housing First, and third-wave behavioral interventions. Gabriela has been recognized with numerous awards, including Health & Medicine Policy Research Group’s 2018 Health Award, and the 2017 Rising Star Award from the Illinois chapter of the National Association for Addiction Professionals (NAADAC).  Gabriela also provides consultation on trauma-informed policy at the national level, as well as training and technical assistance related to serving marginalized communities impacted by trauma and other social determinants of health nationally and internationally.

Continuing Education:

For both the Educational Workshop and Breakfast Keynote:

CEUThe Ecumenical Center is an approved provider of continuing education by the State of Texas for the following: LPC, LMFT, LSW, LCSW AND LMSW

The Educational Workshop on 1/31/2020 provides 6.0 Ethics Continuing Education Units, and the Breakfast Keynote on 2/1/2020 provides 1.25 Ethics Continuing Education Unit.

Also join us for a Conversations About Ethics Breakfast Keynote – Dr. Vincent Felitti, MD on Trauma Informed Care: Adverse Childhood Experiences: An Unrecognized Cause of Adult Social and Emotional Malfunction, Biomedical Disease, and Premature DeathRegister for Breakfast Keynote Here

Conversations About Ethics is presented by Methodist Healthcare Ministries, UT Health San Antonio Center for Medical Humanities and Ethics and The Ecumenical Center.

with Rev. George Mason

 

Summary: I confess that I am addicted to the illusion of control. Even though my spiritual guide clearly assures me that my plans are largely dependent on circumstances WAY beyond my control, I continue to pack my schedule with obligations. Then, when the inevitable glitch upsets my agenda, I can rage righteously about the unfairness of life! I can even shame myself into thinking that I should have planned for that glitch! In an effort to not only preserve my sanity but also hopefully enrich my life, I am working to have a welcoming attitude towards the unexpected. In this workshop, you will be introduced to the trickster, your impish guide toward wholeness. We will engage in art activities designed to gently introduce you to the unexpected, and help you to welcome it into your life.

Objectives:

  1. Participants will become familiar with the Archetype of the Trickster and its function within the psyche.
  2. Participants will explore their dependency on the illusion of control and will be invited to “make peace” with the unexpected.
  3. Participants will engage in art tasks designed to create an unexpected event and then enjoy it as a “happy accident.”

Vicki Williams-Patterson, MCAT, ATR-BC, LP-AT

COUNSELOR & ART THERAPIST

Consulting Art Therapist & Open Studio Facilitator

Vicki Williams-Patterson is a Board Certified Art Therapist and a Licensed Professional Counselor. She has worked as an art therapist since 1983. Her graduate education at Hahnemann University was strongly rooted in developmental psychology and psychodynamic theory, and she has continued with that orientation. Since 1990, she has been conducting seminars on the therapeutic uses of art in the counseling process at local, regional and national conferences.  Since receiving her graduate degree in Art Therapy, she has engaged in advanced professional training in the areas of trauma recovery, Jungian psychology, and Sand Tray Process. In November 2009 she received the American Art Therapy Association’s Annual Award for Clinical Services. She is the past President of the Texas Mental Health Counselors Association, a division of the Texas Counseling Association.

Our clients come to us with many questions, sometimes the struggles they face may lead them to question their faith, or the safe and supportive environment you create may embolden your client to explore their own spiritual journey. This workshop will explore the spiritual competencies endorsed by the American Counseling Association (ACA) and their real-world application.

Learning Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe ACA endorsed spiritual competencies
  • Identify opportunities to engage spiritual work with clients
  • Engage in art intervention to explore spiritual work with clients

Speaker

Salina Shelton, LPC  specializes in individual and group therapy. Among her areas of expertise are chronic pain, grief, depression, anxiety, and career counseling. She presents workshops on the topics of Art Therapy, Grief, and Innovation.

Note: This is a bring-your-own brown bag lunch. The Center will provide drinks.

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly rhythm making session.

Every First Saturday:

10am-11:30am

Therapeutic Rhythm making sessions are open to anyone, so bring along the whole family. No experience is necessary.

Expressive therapeutic rhythm making can have many benefits, such as:

  • Accelerating physical healing and boosting your immune system.
  • Feeling more connected with others.
  • Feeling of well-being.
  • Relieving emotional trauma.
  • Reducing Stress.

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 6

February 3

March 3

April 7

May 5

June 2

July 7

August 4

September 1

October 6

November 3

December 1

This presentation will provide an overview of the multi-cultural aspects of counseling with the military population and discuss common issues in this group. It has long been acknowledged that the military has its own unique culture and counseling needs (e.g., increasing levels of stress, frequent relocations, and extended parental absence). This presentation is designed to help civilian counselors better understand these unique aspects of the military community and how these characteristics directly impact counseling needs. Presenter will discuss how play therapy interventions are an appropriate fit for the counseling issues presented in the military population today. This session will focus on specific interventions to assist military families navigate their challenges associated with the military lifestyle with a focus on directive play therapy techniques that build attachments and promote resiliency. Participants will better understand these challenges and gain an understanding of the cycles face by military families including loss, separation, and transitions associated with moving and deployments as well as understand the importance of building resiliency. Counselors will also gain and understanding of available resources and how to include psycho-educational components when working with parents. Attendees will get an insiders perspective from an experienced military spouse regarding military lifestyle, challenges faced and overcome by military families.

Learning Objectives

After the workshop, participants will be able to

  • have increased knowledge of the cultural aspects of military life and how these characteristics impact counseling needs,
  • identify the unique challenges faced within the military lifestyle with specific examples of play therapy techniques to address specific challenges including loss, separation and transitions; and
  • identify resiliency with an understanding of strategies to build the resiliency of military children and families.

Speaker

Lisa Remey, MEd, LPC, RPT, NCC is a 21 year military spouse who understands firsthand the challenges of military life. She specializes in providing play therapy services to military populations as well as presenting about military families at professional conferences and to military families, on the radio, and contributing to books and articles. Visit Lisa Remey.com to learn more.

Workshop presented by The Ecumenical Center counselors and staff

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly rhythm making session.

Every First Saturday:

10am-11:30am

Therapeutic Rhythm making sessions are open to anyone, so bring along the whole family. No experience is necessary.

Expressive therapeutic rhythm making can have many benefits, such as:

  • Accelerating physical healing and boosting your immune system.
  • Feeling more connected with others.
  • Feeling of well-being.
  • Relieving emotional trauma.
  • Reducing Stress.

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 6

February 3

March 3

April 7

May 5

June 2

July 7

August 4

September 1

October 6

November 3

December 1

With Vicki Williams Patterson at The Ecumenical Center.

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly rhythm making the session.

Every First Saturday:

10am-11:30am

Therapeutic Rhythm making sessions are open to anyone, so bring along the whole family. No experience is necessary.

Expressive therapeutic rhythm making can have many benefits, such as:

  • Accelerating physical healing and boosting your immune system.
  • Feeling more connected with others.
  • Feeling of well-being.
  • Relieving emotional trauma.
  • Reducing Stress.

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 6

February 3

March 3

April 7

May 5

June 2

July 7

August 4

September 1

October 6

November 3

December 1

at The Ecumenical Center

This presentation recalls the experiences of Campbell Chapel A.M.E. Church in the aftermath of the Emanuel Nine Massacre. These events included a powerful outpouring of love from local congregations, community leaders and township officials. Campbell Chapel hosted a prayer vigil where twenty-five local clergy stood in support of the congregation. Seven clergy were on the program and provided inspiring prayers of faith and courage. Local media was present and sympathetic. In the weeks following visitors from across the country attended worship and offered support.

However, some visitors were not so supportive. One white male, in particular, began to attend the Wednesday bible study, which begins at 7 pm. He appeared to be uncomfortable and at times, even bored. He frequently sighed and shook his head, as if in disagreement. When questioned about his behavior, he said he did not notice he was sighing or shaking his head. He had all of the correct answers to the challenge questions. He was there to worship God. He might consider joining the congregation. He wanted to worship in a racially diverse community. At the same time, the membership was worried. A few stopped coming to bible study. His body language and his words were in conflict.

Per the recommendation of the Presiding Elder (equivalent to a District Superintendent), the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division was contacted. They did a background check on the visitor and eventually assigned an armed agent to the congregation. This presentation explores the numerous meetings and conversations prompted by the above events.

Objectives

This presentation moves the conversation of congregation safety from the theoretical to actual experiences and events of a real congregation. It provides nuance to the dialog and adds meaning. Participants will gain insight concerning evaluating and addressing issues of congregation safety, the role of law enforcement and/or firearms in protecting a congregation, strategies for addressing a congregation’s fear and methods for balancing openness for ministry with protecting the flock. This presentation will help clergy and lay leaders in:

  • evaluating the safety of their current ministry setting;
  • exploring the notion of balancing openness to ministry with members’ safety;
  • share methods of addressing fear and anxiety during worship experiences; and
  • predetermine the use of law enforcement and armed security.

Speaker

Jon R. Black is an ordained itinerate elder of the African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church. A retired Navy Chaplain, Jon has served five A.M.E. congregations and numerous military chapels. He is currently the senior pastor of Campbell Chapel A.M.E. Church of Bluffton, South Carolina. He holds the Master of Divinity Degree from Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary and the Master of Theology and Doctor of Ministry Degrees from Princeton Theological Seminary.

Rev. Clementa Pinckney was a close friend of Jon’s. Rev. Pinckney served as the senior pastor of Campbell Chapel before being assigned to Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church, the site of the Emanuel Nine Massacre. In the aftermath of the Emanuel Nine Massacre, Jon has been able to reflect theologically on issues of congregation safety and open door ministry to others.

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly rhythm making session.

Every First Saturday:

10am-11:30am

Therapeutic Rhythm making sessions are open to anyone, so bring along the whole family. No experience is necessary.

Expressive therapeutic rhythm making can have many benefits, such as:

  • Accelerating physical healing and boosting your immune system.
  • Feeling more connected with others.
  • Feeling of well-being.
  • Relieving emotional trauma.
  • Reducing Stress.

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 6

February 3

March 3

April 7

May 5

June 2

July 7

August 4

September 1

October 6

November 3

December 1

at The Ecumenical Center

THIS IS PART ONE of a two-day workshop on Trauma Informed Practices for Practitioners (TIPPS): Helping Surviving Children in School and Community Settings. YOU MAY REGISTER FOR ONE OR BOTH DAYS.
Information and Registration for Day Two: Trauma Regulated Reintegration and Resilience Practices

Trauma is explored as an experience resulting in dysregulated adaptation of the nervous system and integrated brain functions dictating the use of specific trauma- sensitive intervention stages and practices. Using video segments and numerous group activities, participants discover the limitations of talk, reason and logic in the face of trauma, while discovering the world of survivors and the value of varied sensory-based interventions. Topic areas cover the anatomy of fear, explicit/ implicit processes, the corpus callosum, regulation, co-regulation, vagus nerve, sensory processing issues in trauma, trauma- informed practice beliefs, what constitutes safety for the practitioner and survivor, first-hand survivor accounts, the six stages of intervention.

Learning Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  1. Identify core nervous system and brain processes resulting from traumatic experiences. And how they impact thinking, feeling and behavior.
  2. Identify 10 specific ways survivors experience trauma
  3. Discuss how the use of the body becomes a healing resource for survivors.
  4. Identify the six stages/processes of trauma- informed intervention and what matters most to survivors.

Speaker

Dr. Steele’s work with survivors of suicide and homicide began in 1980. Over the years he has assisted survivors and professionals following such tragic and traumatic incidents as the Gulf War, the bombing of the Federal Building in Oklahoma, 9/11 in New York and Washington D.C., Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, the 2009 killings of a high school coach in Iowa and a teacher in Texas, far too many suicides of school aged children and teens and the daily trauma children experience which never receive national media attention.

Always a practitioner and passionate about bringing practitioners interventions he found helpful for survivors, led to his founding of the National Institute for Trauma and Loss in Children (TLC) in 1990. In 1997 he initiated a trauma and loss certification program. Today thousands of TLC Certified Trauma Specialists and Consultants, that Dr. Steele personally trained, are using his evidence-based intervention programs in 55 countries. Retired from TLC in 2013, he continues to train, consult and write about trauma, its impact on learning and behavior and advances in helping survivors with resolve and resilience.

Dr. Steele has published varied articles and contributed numerous chapters to major publications in the field of trauma such as the, Clinical Handbook of Art Therapy, the Handbook of Play Therapy and Children in the Urban Environment. His most recent books include, Optimizing Learning Outcomes: Brain-Centric Trauma-Informed Practices (2017);Trauma In Schools and Communities: Recovery Lessons from Survivors and Responders (2015), and Trauma Informed Practice for Children and Adolescents, (2012).

Research suggests that many clinicians do not routinely ask about or screen for Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) due to lack of training and concerns about time constraints. Many are unaware of the potential for long-lasting medical consequences from ACEs/childhood trauma, which have a powerful effect on physical and mental health in adulthood.

Join Vincent Felitti, MD, in a discussion on Adverse Childhood Experiences: An Unrecognized Cause of Adult Social and Emotional Malfunction, Biomedical Disease, and Premature Death. The effects of not taking a trauma-informed approach to health care that can lead to less optimal outcomes and missed opportunities to reduce health harms associated with prior exposure to ACEs and how clinicians who are not trained to consider the possible role of ACEs may be less effective in managing the long-term health issues that can result from them.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to describe how the Adverse Childhood Experience Study can inform health care practice and promote trauma-informed physical and mental health care, helping them to meet their ethical responsibility to advocate for patients’ welfare and alleviate suffering.
  • Participants will be able to summarize the prevalence and long-term physical and mental health effects of ACE’s.

 

About Our Speaker

Vincent Felitti, MD, Co-Principal Investigator, Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California San Diego will discuss Adverse Childhood Experiences: An Unrecognized Cause of Adult Social and Emotional Malfunction, Biomedical Disease, and Premature Death.

To read more about Dr. Felitti, click here.

 

 

 

Dr. Felitti’s keynote is part of the 13th Annual Community Service Learning Conference

Also join us for the Education Workshop with Gabriela Zapata-Alma,LCSW, CADC on Cultivating Trauma-informed Approaches and Organizations: An Ethical Imperative (@ The Ecumenical Center)Register for Educational Workshop Here

 

Continuing Education for both the Educational Workshop and Breakfast Keynote:

CME:This activity has been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™.

†This presentation meets the Texas Medical Board criteria for formal continuing medical education involving the study of medical ethics and/or professional responsibility.

CEUThe Ecumenical Center is an approved provider of continuing education by the State of Texas for the following: LPC, LMFT, LSW, LCSW AND LMSW

The Educational Workshop on 1/31/2020 provides 6.0 Ethics Continuing Education Units, and the Breakfast Keynote on 2/1/2020  provides 1.25 Ethics Continuing Education Unit.

Conversations About Ethics is presented by Methodist Healthcare Ministries, UT Health San Antonio Center for Medical Humanities and Ethics and The Ecumenical Center.

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly rhythm making session.

Every First Saturday:

10am-11:30am

Therapeutic Rhythm making sessions are open to anyone, so bring along the whole family. No experience is necessary.

Expressive therapeutic rhythm making can have many benefits, such as:

  • Accelerating physical healing and boosting your immune system.
  • Feeling more connected with others.
  • Feeling of well-being.
  • Relieving emotional trauma.
  • Reducing Stress.

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 6

February 3

March 3

April 7

May 5

June 2

July 7

August 4

September 1

October 6

November 3

December 1

with Kendra Drumryl at The Ecumenical Center

THIS IS PART TWO of a two-day workshop on Trauma Informed Practices for Practitioners (TIPPS): Helping Surviving Children in School and Community Settings. YOU MAY REGISTER FOR ONE OR BOTH DAYS.
Information and Registration for Day One: Trauma: What Our Brain, Nervous System and Survivors Tell Us Matters Most

This workshop involves participants in a series of varied activities using the body and other expressive modalities that help empower trauma victim’s success in regulating their reactions to past and current trauma while doing the re-processing needed to achieve trauma integration-moving from victim to survivor to thriver. It provides participants the opportunity to experience first hand how to safely integrate these processes into their practice. Processing participant’s experiences in groups provides them the opportunity to raise questions and or concerns about integrating these practices in their current settings

Learning Objectives

Learners will be able to:

  1. Discuss the practice issues for initiating the use of the body and other self -expressive modalities to assist trauma survivors.
  2.  Identify the many possible responses clients can experience when using sensory-based interventions.
  3. Determine, as a result of their own reactions to these practices, if they wish to integrate these into their intervention processes, pursue additional training or take a different approach.  

Speaker

Dr. Steele’s work with survivors of suicide and homicide began in 1980. Over the years he has assisted survivors and professionals following such tragic and traumatic incidents as the Gulf War, the bombing of the Federal Building in Oklahoma, 9/11 in New York and Washington D.C., Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, the 2009 killings of a high school coach in Iowa and a teacher in Texas, far too many suicides of school aged children and teens and the daily trauma children experience which never receive national media attention.

Always a practitioner and passionate about bringing practitioners interventions he found helpful for survivors, led to his founding of the National Institute for Trauma and Loss in Children (TLC) in 1990. In 1997 he initiated a trauma and loss certification program. Today thousands of TLC Certified Trauma Specialists and Consultants, that Dr. Steele personally trained, are using his evidence-based intervention programs in 55 countries. Retired from TLC in 2013, he continues to train, consult and write about trauma, its impact on learning and behavior and advances in helping survivors with resolve and resilience.

Dr. Steele has published varied articles and contributed numerous chapters to major publications in the field of trauma such as the, Clinical Handbook of Art Therapy, the Handbook of Play Therapy and Children in the Urban Environment. His most recent books include, Optimizing Learning Outcomes: Brain-Centric Trauma-Informed Practices (2017);Trauma In Schools and Communities: Recovery Lessons from Survivors and Responders (2015), and Trauma Informed Practice for Children and Adolescents, (2012).

A decade ago, The Ecumenical Center embarked on a program to increase and encourage the growth of an extraordinary ethical business community in San Antonio. Since then, local business leaders have partnered with students from The University of Texas at San Antonio, St. Mary’s University, Trinity University, and the University of the Incarnate Word to identify excellence in ethical business practices.

We invite you to join us for the annual Ethics in Business San Antonio (EIBSA) Luncheon on Wednesday, May 23, at the San Antonio Country Club from 11:30 a.m to 1:00 p.m. Our keynote speaker will be prominent business, Mr. J. Kuper.

In addition to recognizing excellence in organizations, The Lahourcade Award is presented at the luncheon to an individual or group that has demonstrated high integrity and ethical decision-making. This year’s award will go to Mrs. Kathleen Kuper from Kuper Sotheby’s International Realty whose commitment to ethics in business knows no bounds.

Proceeds from the event support the education, counseling, and wellness programs at The Center, which is dedicated to healing and growth in our community.

If you would like to attend the event, have questions, or need additional information, please register 24782-02_ECUM_2018_EIBSA_SponsorshipForm_CLAPP or contact Lejla Cenanovic at lcenanovic@ecrh.org or call 210.616.0885.

A special thanks to Mrs. Maray Carter Chair of the EISBA Luncheon, and Mr. John Weber, EIBSA Steering Committee Chairman, for his commitment to the program.

In this two-day presentation, participants will learn how Child-Centered Play Therapy (CCPT) honors and highlights the innate resources of the child to heal and thus fosters resilience in children. An Integrative Approach will be shared consisting of contributions from CCPT, Directive Play Therapy, CBT, Family Therapy, and Animal-Assisted Therapy can be blended to offer what Dr. Helen Benedict refers to as Child-Responsive Therapy. The process of play therapy consisting especially of the therapeutic relationship, but also including therapist attunement, presence, unflinching empathy, “deep hearing” (Carl Rogers), perseverance, commitment, compassion combined with the resources that the child or family brings creates a complex and rich process that promotes resilience and healing. Directive therapy interventions are also sometimes indicated and helpful in jumpstarting the therapeutic process or to structure the therapeutic context in ways that enables children to communicate with us. For most young children and traumatized clients of any age, verbal expressive therapy may fail because verbal expression is hindered by developmental constraints and/or trauma effects. A wide range of play and expressive arts interventions will be described and in some cases experienced by the participants during the course of the two days including use of puppets, drawing and artwork, storytelling, narrative story stems, clinical use of symbols, guided imagery and fantasy techniques, sandtray, and drama.

The workshop is intended for all mental health, school counseling, and members of the clergy who provide counseling to children, adolescents, and families. The two-day presentation will invite participation by experiential activities, small group discussion, role-play demonstrations, and sharing of clinical examples by the presenter that will encourage input from attendees. Participants will learn to trust the rich clinical process and the capacity for resilience in children and families, and ways to foster and enhance these healing resources through the use of practical tools and interventions that can be used in play therapy, family therapy, poetry, and journal writing, in individual, family or group counseling sessions.

Specific Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will learn to appreciate the components of the rich and complex process of therapy;
  2. Participants will learn to identify the factors that contribute most to therapy/counseling successful outcomes;
  3. Participants will be able to identify the compelling strengths of CCPT, but also how an Integrated Approach may truly be the most Child Responsive form of therapy;
  4. Participants will learn when and how to introduce therapist-directed interventions and the rationale for doing so.
  5. Participants will learn a wide range of directive interventions ranging from play to poetry, art, storytelling, and many others that they can use in their counseling settings.

Daily Schedule

8:30 to 9 am: Check-in

9 am: Workshop begins

10:30 am: Break

10:45 am: Workshop reconvenes

12 pm: Lunch

1 pm: Workshop reconvenes

2:30 pm: Break

2:45 pm: Workshop reconvenes

4:30 pm: Workshop ends

Speaker

David A. Crenshaw is Clinical Director of the Children’s Home of Poughkeepsie. He is a Board Certified Clinical Psychologist, Fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA), Fellow of APA’s Division of Child and Adolescent Psychology, and a Registered-Play Therapist-Supervisor (RPT-S). He has taught graduate courses in counseling and play therapy at Johns Hopkins University, Teachers College, Columbia University and Marist College. He was President of the New York Association for Play Therapy (2004-2008). He is the author or editor of 15 books, numerous journal articles and book chapters on child trauma, child abuse, play therapy and youth violence. Visit Rhinebeck Child and Family Center for more information about his work.

Refund Policy:

Refunds will only be processed for cancellations received on or before two weeks prior to the date of the workshop minus a $10 processing fee. No refund will be issued for cancellations received less than 7 days before the first day of workshop.

With Vicki Williams Patterson at The Ecumenical Center

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Poetry Writing Circle.

Poetry circles are open to anyone 18 years of age and older. No experience with writing poetry is necessary!

Bring your notebook or journal.

 

Every Third Saturday:

10am-12:30am

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 20

February 17

March 17

April 21

May 19

June 16

July 21

August 18

September 15

October 20

November 17

December 15

Parents and educators are often surprised by the challenges of raising and teaching gifted children. These children often have intense emotions to match their strong abilities. Some are fearful, shy and oversensitive and others are too bold, brash or bragging. Parents and teachers are easily intimidated by their adult-sounding vocabulary, but counselors can give them the tools to parent and teach with confidence.

Sensitivity and intensity may permit children to experience great emotional depth but oversensitivity unfortunately leads children toward perfectionism, avoiding challenge and underachievement. When sensitive adults respond intuitively to oversensitive children they may unintentionally overprotect them and increase their anxiety.

Over-empowered and bold children who talk incessantly, brag and argue soon alienate teachers, siblings and peers. Counterintuitive responses that set boundaries and prevent manipulations can be used to teach skills that allow them achievement and good social relationships.

This presentation will give counselors tools for guiding parents and teachers so that they in turn can help gifted children achieve to their potential and contribute to their communities.

Learning Objectives

After the workshop, participants will

  • better understand the social and emotional needs of gifted children
  • learn about tools that can be used for guiding highly sensitive, over-empowered or bold gifted children
  • be able to better guide parents and teachers toward setting realistic expectations for gifted children
  • better understand the place of motivation and pressures in facilitating gifted children’s achievement

Speaker

Dr. Sylvia Rimm is a psychologist who directs the Family Achievement Clinic in Ohio and specializes in working with gifted children and adults. She is also a clinical professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and counsels at Menlo Park Academy, a K-8 charter school for gifted children. Dr. Rimm speaks and publishes internationally on parenting, giftedness, creativity and underachievement. Among her many books are Education of the Gifted and Talented, Why Bright Kids Get Poor Grades and What You Can Do About It, How to Parent So Children Will Learn, Keys to Parenting the Gifted Child, See Jane Win®How Jane Won, Jane Wins Again, and See Jane Win for Girls. See Jane Win® was a New York Times Best Seller and was featured on The Oprah Winfrey Show and in People magazine. Dr. Rimm was a longtime contributor to NBC’s Today Show, hosted Family Talk on public radio nationally, and serves on the Board of Directors of the National Association for Gifted Children. She has received the prestigious Anne F. Isaacs, Robert Rossmiller and Palmarium awards for her lifetime contributions to gifted children.

by Vicki Williams Paterson

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly rhythm making session.

Every First Saturday:

10am-11:30am

Therapeutic Rhythm making sessions are open to anyone, so bring along the whole family. No experience is necessary.

Expressive therapeutic rhythm making can have many benefits, such as:

  • Accelerating physical healing and boosting your immune system.
  • Feeling more connected with others.
  • Feeling of well-being.
  • Relieving emotional trauma.
  • Reducing Stress.

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 6

February 3

March 3

April 7

May 5

June 2

July 7

August 4

September 1

October 6

November 3

December 1

Help Them Quit: Motivational Interviewing & Addiction provides an introduction to the Motivational Interviewing, an evidence-based approach to conversations about change inherent in addiction work.  The focus of the workshop will be on helping professionals who work with individuals struggling with addiction develop relationships and dialogue that deepens commitment for change and health.  By learning what to emphasize and what to let go, how to transition between sharing information and eliciting information, providers will learn how to make every word count.

Specific Learning Objectives

At this 1-day workshop, Learners will:

  1. verbalize the spirit, four principles and four processes of Motivational Interviewing,
  2. specify examples of communication that are inconsistent with an MI approach and explain why this may not be the best way to individuals struggling with addiction, and
  3. practice core Motivational Interviewing skills (e.g., open-ended inquiry, affirmation, reflective listening)

Special guest Patrick Kennedy will join us in the morning to briefly share his personal story of overcoming addiction. He is a powerful mental health advocate.

Speaker

Dr. Annette Brooks is a clinical psychologist specializing in health psychology and organizational management.  She draws on over 20 years of experience teaching and training on communication, change engagement, and interpersonal “soft” skills.  Dr. Brooks has been training Motivational Interviewing nationally since 2000.  She is a member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers, Inc. (MINT) and a national MI consultant for the national Evidence-Based Practice Initiative.  In addition to offering workshops on motivational interviewing and communication, she serves as the Organization Development Consultant at the New Mexico VA Health Care System and Assistant Professor in the Psychiatry Department at the University of New Mexico.  Dr. Brooks is also a graduate of the VA Leadership Institute and a certified VA Mentor.

with Linda Homeyer at The Ecumenical Center.

March 26th and 27th.

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly rhythm making session.

Every First Saturday:

10am-11:30am

Therapeutic Rhythm making sessions are open to anyone, so bring along the whole family. No experience is necessary.

Expressive therapeutic rhythm making can have many benefits, such as:

  • Accelerating physical healing and boosting your immune system.
  • Feeling more connected with others.
  • Feeling of well-being.
  • Relieving emotional trauma.
  • Reducing Stress.

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 6

February 3

March 3

April 7

May 5

June 2

July 7

August 4

September 1

October 6

November 3

December 1

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly rhythm making session.

Every First Saturday:

10am-11:30am

Therapeutic Rhythm making sessions are open to anyone, so bring along the whole family. No experience is necessary.

Expressive therapeutic rhythm making can have many benefits, such as:

  • Accelerating physical healing and boosting your immune system.
  • Feeling more connected with others.
  • Feeling of well-being.
  • Relieving emotional trauma.
  • Reducing Stress.

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 6

February 3

March 3

April 7

May 5

June 2

July 7

August 4

September 1

October 6

November 3

December 1

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly rhythm making session.

Every First Saturday:

10am-11:30am

Therapeutic Rhythm making sessions are open to anyone, so bring along the whole family. No experience is necessary.

Expressive therapeutic rhythm making can have many benefits, such as:

  • Accelerating physical healing and boosting your immune system.
  • Feeling more connected with others.
  • Feeling of well-being.
  • Relieving emotional trauma.
  • Reducing Stress.

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 6

February 3

March 3

April 7

May 5

June 2

July 7

August 4

September 1

October 6

November 3

December 1

with Vicki Williams Patterson at The Ecumenical Center.

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly rhythm making session.

Every First Saturday:

10am-11:30am

Therapeutic Rhythm making sessions are open to anyone, so bring along the whole family. No experience is necessary.

Expressive therapeutic rhythm making can have many benefits, such as:

  • Accelerating physical healing and boosting your immune system.
  • Feeling more connected with others.
  • Feeling of well-being.
  • Relieving emotional trauma.
  • Reducing Stress.

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 6

February 3

March 3

April 7

May 5

June 2

July 7

August 4

September 1

October 6

November 3

December 1

with Vicki Williams Patterson at The Ecumenical Center

 

The Art Heals Hearts Private Art Sale & Preview Exhibition is an invitation-only event.

Exquisite art pieces by professional artists will be on display and available for sale.  Proceeds benefit the Children’s Open Art Studio and its programs in San Antonio and Sutherland Springs.

Spirits and hors d’oeuvres will be served and we will hold a drawing for an original painting by Franco Mondini-Ruiz, called “Vatican.”*

For more information please call 210.616.0885 or email Lejla at Lcenanovic@ecrh.org.  Click the button below for sponsorship opportunities.

 

Visual Exhibit continues through January 2019.

 

Business casual. Valet parking available.

*Must be present to win.

Medical research always carries risk, and this even more true for gene editing, which makes heritable changes. It has the potential to eradicate single-gene diseases, like Huntington’s Disease, in the not-too-distant future, but there are potential trade-offs. One enduring fear is that diversity will be lost as the range of acceptable traits narrows. Whether we should use gene editing in humans is a matter of urgent ethical debate. How we should use it, if we do, raises a series of complex issues that will challenge our agreed ethical principles and regulatory frameworks. Although the technology is in its infancy, the time to start addressing the ethical and regulatory issues is now.  Hear an ethical perspective from Julian Savulescu, PhDUehiro Chair in Practical Ethics Director, Oxford Oehiro Centre for Practical Ethics Co-Director, Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities University of Oxford. This Conversation About Ethics consists of two events:

 

Evening Keynote
Monday, September 23, 2019
5:00 p.m. Reception | 6 – 7 p.m. Lecture
UT Health Science Center | Pestana Lecture Hall 3.104A
7703 Floyd Curl | 210-567-0795 (Contact: Sheila Hotchkin)

This talk discusses how accepting and managing the revolution of gene editing is key to it unfolding ethically and to the benefit of humanity, and the individuals who pioneer it as research subjects.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to articulate ethical reasons for and against pursuing gene-editing trials in humans.
  • Participants will be able to describe potential impacts of human gene-editing on individuals directly affected by the technology, members of society who may be affected in less direct ways, and humanity in general.

 

Luncheon Seminar
Tuesday, September 24, 2019
11:45 a.m. – 2 p.m.
The Ecumenical Center
8310 Ewing Halsell | 210-616-0885 (Lejla Cenanovic)

Explore the potential trade-offs that would be made by attempts to genetically engineer apparently adverse personality traits, including between individually beneficial traits and collectively beneficial traits.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to articulate ethical reasons for and against pursuing gene-editing trials in humans.
  • Participants will be able to describe potential impacts of human gene-editing on individuals directly affected by the technology, members of society who may be affected in less direct ways, and humanity in general.
  • Participants will be able to describe justifications for and objections to moral bioenhancement.

Our Speaker

Julian Savulescu, PhD, has held the Uehiro Chair in Practical Ethics at the University of Oxford since 2002. Dr. Savulescu has degrees in medicine, neuroscience and bioethics, directs the Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics within the Faculty of Philosophy, and leads a Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator award on Responsibility and Health Care.

In 2017, Dr. Savulescu joined the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, spending four months per year as Visiting Professorial Fellow in Biomedical Ethics, and Melbourne University as Distinguished International Visiting Professor in Law.

A leader in medical and practical ethics, with more than 400 publications, an h index of 63 and over 15, 000 citations in total. Dr. Savulescu spent 10 years as Editor of the Journal of Medical Ethics, the highest impact journal in the field, and is founding editor of Journal of Practical Ethics, an open access journal in Practical Ethics.

 

Conversations About Ethics is presented by Methodist Healthcare Ministries, UT Health San Antonio Center for Medical Humanities and Ethics and The Ecumenical Center.

by Vicki Williams Patterson at The Ecumenical Center

at the San Antonio Country Club

with Vicki Williams Patterson

First responders provide critical services to communities in the aftermath of disasters, both natural and manmade. Their work can be dangerous, physically demanding, personally draining and heart-breaking, often involving long hours in difficult circumstances. Their exposure to traumatic events and devastating circumstances can lead to a range of health and mental health consequences, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), compassion fatigue and burnout.
This daylong workshop provides us a comprehensive overview of the various forms of trauma and how they can clinically, psychologically and operationally impact trauma survivors. Dr. Goldstein will discuss how to create psychological plans for trauma survivors dealing with symptoms such as guilt, survivor guilt, shame, loss, amnesia and somatization.

Learning Objectives

  • Provide a comprehensive overview trauma in various forms and how that trauma can clinically, psychologically and operationally impact trauma survivors.
  • Describe a trauma team assessment protocol which evaluates simple and complex trauma.
  • Discuss possible psychological plans for trauma survivors depending on a crisis care team.
  • Discuss working knowledge of the associated trauma symptoms such as guilt, survivor guilt, shame, loss, amnesia, and somatization.
  • Describe how to support resilience protocols for first responders and/or individuals in high stress occupations.

About the Speaker

Frank L. Goldstein, PhD: Director, Behavioral Health and Resilience Okaloosa County EMS, Director, Emerald Coast Crisis Stress Team. Senior Clinical Mental Health Specialist, Florida Disaster Medical Response Federal Team, Northwest Florida Regional Medical Response Team and Okaloosa-Walton Medical Reserve Corps. Faculty, Northwest Florida State College Leadership Institute, Niceville, FL, and Graduate Faculty, Forensic Psychology, Marymount University, Arlington, VA.  Forty years’ experience as First Responder, Commander (USAF Colonel, Ret.), director, educator, behavioral scientist, clinician, business leader, author and motivational speaker. Skilled in disaster support, crisis and stress management, post-traumatic stress disorders, human sexuality, psychological operations, information operations, human factors profiling (domestic and international), and psychological and analytical research.

Support Strategies for coping with grief and the holidays. For those who have lost a loved one, family or a friend.

Friday, November 17, 2017, at 6:30 p.m.

The Ecumenical Center | 8310 Ewing Halsell Drive | San Antonio, TX 78229

Facilitator: Sally Gomez-Jung

RSVP/ Lcenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616.0885

Light refreshments will be provided.

at The Ecumenical Center

June 4th – 6th

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Poetry Writing Circle.

Poetry circles are open to anyone 18 years of age and older. No experience with writing poetry is necessary!

Bring your notebook or journal.

 

Every Third Saturday:

10am-12:30am

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

 

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 20

February 17

March 17

April 21

May 19

June 16

July 21

August 18

September 15

October 20

November 17

December 15

at The Ecumenical Center

June 10th, 17th and 24th

Join us Friday, October 26 at The Center for the Art Heals Hearts Public Exhibition and see how the power of expression can bring special healing.

Visual exhibit continues through January 2019. Proceeds benefit the Children’s Open Arts Studio and its programs in San Antonio and Sutherland Springs.

For more information please call Lejla at 210.616.0885 or email Lcenanovic@ecrh.org.

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Poetry Writing Circle.

Poetry circles are open to anyone 18 years of age and older. No experience with writing poetry is necessary!

Bring your notebook or journal.

 

Every Third Saturday:

10am-12:30am

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

 

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 20

February 17

March 17

April 21

May 19

June 16

July 21

August 18

September 15

October 20

November 17

December 15

Event Info

Date: Jan 20, 2015 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Location: The Ecumenical Center – 8310 Ewing Halsell Dr.

Brown Bag Lunch – BYOL
Iced tea provided

Cost: $25

Includes 2 CEUs

CEUs available for LPC, LMFT, RPT and Social Workers. APT Approved Provider 08-217.

About

“By making things visible, they become real. A visible thing is concrete and makes sense. We thus use the fact that something can be seen to call it into existence and give it meaning…When something is not visible, it is not here, not available for us to experience. We thus use lack of visibility to explain something that does not make sense.” Retrieved from: http://changingminds.org/techniques/language/metaphor/metaphors_sight.htm on 1/6/2015

The paired metaphors of light and darkness get to the very heart of the therapeutic process no matter what clinical techniques are being employed. Verbal techniques use the language of metaphor often to express what cannot be scientifically measured. They say things like, “I just can’t see what you mean.” Or “I’m worried because he is in such a dark place.” In play therapy, all forms of light and dark come and go: the sun, rain, lanterns, caves, being buried, being uncovered, burning, being burnt, being lit, being snuffed out. Finally, in art therapy, the metaphor itself becomes very concrete. A client draws something, and that which was once unseen can be seen.

In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to understand the complexity of the light and dark metaphor so as to better use it in their work. We will be making art as well, both for our own process as therapists, and for our ongoing clinical work as verbal, art, and play therapists.

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will become familiar with the metaphor of light and dark as it relates to the healing process of clinical art, play, verbal therapy.
  2. Participants will engage in art making tasks designed to heighten their awareness of how the metaphor of light and dark can enhance their clinical work as art, play and verbal therapists.
  3. Participants will share their personal insights as to how the metaphor of light and darkness can improve their work with clients in clinical art, play and verbal therapy.

Facilitator

Vicki Williams-Patterson

Vicki Williams-Patterson has worked as an art therapist since 1983. Her graduate education at Hahnemann University was strongly rooted in developmental psychology and psychodynamic theory, and she has continued with that orientation. Since 1990, she has been conducting seminars on the therapeutic uses of art in the counseling process at local, regional and national conferences. Since receiving her graduate degree in Art Therapy, she has engaged in advanced professional training in the areas of trauma recovery, Jungian psychology, and Sand Tray Process. In November 2009 she received the American Art Therapy Association’s Annual Award for Clinical Services.

with Vicki Williams Patterson at The Ecumenical Center.

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Poetry Writing Circle.

Poetry circles are open to anyone 18 years of age and older. No experience with writing poetry is necessary!

Bring your notebook or journal.

 

Every Third Saturday:

10am-12:30am

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

 

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 20

February 17

March 17

April 21

May 19

June 16

July 21

August 18

September 15

October 20

November 17

December 15

with Play doh, model magic, wet sand, wood assembling and Legos by Vicki Williams Patterson at The Ecumenical Center.

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Poetry Writing Circle.

Poetry circles are open to anyone 18 years of age and older. No experience with writing poetry is necessary!

Bring your notebook or journal.

 

Every Third Saturday:

10am-12:30am

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

 

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 20

February 17

March 17

April 21

May 19

June 16

July 21

August 18

September 15

October 20

November 17

December 15

at The Ecumenical Center

July 22nd and 29th

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Poetry Writing Circle.

Poetry circles are open to anyone 18 years of age and older. No experience with writing poetry is necessary!

Bring your notebook or journal.

 

Every Third Saturday:

10am-12:30am

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

 

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 20

February 17

March 17

April 21

May 19

June 16

July 21

August 18

September 15

October 20

November 17

December 15

with Vicki Williams Patterson at The Ecumenical Center.

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Poetry Writing Circle.

Poetry circles are open to anyone 18 years of age and older. No experience with writing poetry is necessary!

Bring your notebook or journal.

 

Every Third Saturday:

10am-12:30am

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

 

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 20

February 17

March 17

April 21

May 19

June 16

July 21

August 18

September 15

October 20

November 17

December 15

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Poetry Writing Circle.

Poetry circles are open to anyone 18 years of age and older. No experience with writing poetry is necessary!

Bring your notebook or journal.

 

Every Third Saturday:

10am-12:30am

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

 

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 20

February 17

March 17

April 21

May 19

June 16

July 21

August 18

September 15

October 20

November 17

December 15

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Poetry Writing Circle.

Poetry circles are open to anyone 18 years of age and older. No experience with writing poetry is necessary!

Bring your notebook or journal.

 

Every Third Saturday:

10am-12:30am

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

 

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 20

February 17

March 17

April 21

May 19

June 16

July 21

August 18

September 15

October 20

November 17

December 15

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Poetry Writing Circle.

Poetry circles are open to anyone 18 years of age and older. No experience with writing poetry is necessary!

Bring your notebook or journal.

 

Every Third Saturday:

10am-12:30am

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

 

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 20

February 17

March 17

April 21

May 19

June 16

July 21

August 18

September 15

October 20

November 17

December 15

by Christine A. Courtois at The Ecumenical Center

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Poetry Writing Circle.

Poetry circles are open to anyone 18 years of age and older. No experience with writing poetry is necessary!

Bring your notebook or journal.

 

Every Third Saturday:

10am-12:30am

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

 

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 20

February 17

March 17

April 21

May 19

June 16

July 21

August 18

September 15

October 20

November 17

December 15

with Vicki Williams Patterson

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly rhythm making session.

Every First Saturday:

10am-11:30am

Therapeutic Rhythm making sessions are open to anyone, so bring along the whole family. No experience is necessary.

Expressive therapeutic rhythm making can have many benefits, such as:

  • Accelerating physical healing and boosting your immune system.
  • Feeling more connected with others.
  • Feeling of well-being.
  • Relieving emotional trauma.
  • Reducing Stress.

To reserve a place, please email Lejla Cenanovic at LCenanovic@ecrh.org or call (210) 616-0885.

List of all upcoming monthly sessions:

January 6

February 3

March 3

April 7

May 5

June 2

July 7

August 4

September 1

October 6

November 3

December 1

at The Ecumenical Center

The Adlerian belief in the ability to make new choices and to reinterpret situations, provides a vehicle for play therapists to work with children to get out of their boxes, change their lifestyle patterns, increase their social interest, make shifts in the goals of their behavior and a host of other forums for determining their paths.

Experience this two-day workshop designed to teach you exciting new ways to include families in the play therapy process using Adlerian play therapy as an approach to working with children, families and adults that combines the ideas and techniques of Individual Psychology and play therapy.

Discuss how to use play therapy techniques, active games, movement and dance, art activities and metaphoric storytelling to involve the various members of a family in play therapy and use the power of play to help them communicate more clearly, strengthen relationships and solve problems more effectively.

Join Terry Kottman, PhD for two full days of hands-on activity and experience. Wear comfortable clothes and shoes.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to explain the rationale for family play therapy.
  • Participants will be able to describe 3 active games, 3 art techniques, and 3 play therapy techniques to use in family play therapy.
  • Participants will identify 3 Adlerian concepts used to understand family members in family play therapy.

About the Speaker: Terry Kottman, PhDNCC, RPT-S, LMHC

Terry Kottman, Ph.D., NCC, RPT-S, LMHC, founded The Encouragement Zone where she developed Adlerian play therapy. Terry is a published author of numerous books including, Play Therapy: Basics and Beyond, co-author (with Kristin Meany-Walen) of Partners in Play: An Adlerian Approach to Play Therapy and Doing Play Therapy: From Building the Relationship to Facilitating Change. Terry is also the recipient of the 2014 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Play Therapy and the 2017 Lifetime achievement Award from the Iowa Association for Play Therapy.

at The Ecumenical Center

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Open Art Studio Session. A wonderful opportunity for people of all ages (6-106) to use art materials in a playful manner in a relaxed setting.

To reserve a seat, please email Vlwpatrbc@gmail.com or call Lejla Cenanovic at The Center (210) 616-0885.

Every Fourth Saturday:

10:00am-1:00pm

at The Ecumenical Center

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Open Art Studio Session. A wonderful opportunity for people of all ages (6-106) to use art materials in a playful manner in a relaxed setting.

To reserve a seat, please email Vlwpatrbc@gmail.com or call Lejla Cenanovic at The Center (210) 616-0885.

Every Fourth Saturday:

10:00am-1:00pm

You have worked hard during your 10-week CPRT training and are beginning to reap the rewards of “Special Play Time.” Maybe you’ve been able to maintain a weekly schedule, or perhaps circumstances have disrupted your schedule. Even though you have consulted your manual, maybe situations have come up that have you stuck, and you’re not sure how to get back on track. Some of you may just miss the support and encouragement that was part of your training experience.

You’re ready for CPRT Discovery group!
The “Curve of Learning” described below probably seems familiar to you, but what you don’t know is that this series of Stages will continue to occur throughout your life as a parent. Something will change: your child goes to a new school, another child becomes a part of your family, or a tragedy may strike your family. When these changes come, the curve of Learning starts over! First you must regain your excitement that springs from your confidence in yourself and your commitment to your relationship with your child. There will be awkward moments and times when you can’t think of what to do. Then, eventually, you will gain a new closeness and a deeper understanding of both yourself and your child. “The Curve of Learning” is really a spiral, expanding as you and your child discover, grow, and change together.

Curve of Learning (from the Arthur Murray Dance Advice for Humans)

  1. The Initial Stage: You are nervous and excited about the possibility of developing a better relationship your child. Your heart is hoping that this will work. You are ready to learn something new!
  2. The Awkward Use Stage: You are learning new skills and your brain is in charge rather than your heart. You feel slow and awkward in your practice sessions with your child.
  3. The Conscious Use Phase: You are beginning to relax into the process and you are seeing a whole new side to your child. A battle sometimes erupts between your brain and your heart. You lose spontaneity because you are suddenly thinking, “Is this the right thing to say?”
  4. The Natural Use Stage: Your CPRT training has become a part of who you are and, the “Special Play Time” experiences are integrated into your whole relationship with your child. You and your child are discovering a unique understanding of each other and’ you are creatively encountering new ways of relating to each other.

FACILITATOR: Vicki Williams – Patterson, MCAT, LPC-AT

REGISTRATIONS : Lejla Cenanovic (210)616-0885 or Lcenanovic@ecrh.org

with Vicki Williams Patterson

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Open Art Studio Session. A wonderful opportunity for people of all ages (6-106) to use art materials in a playful manner in a relaxed setting.

To reserve a seat, please email Vlwpatrbc@gmail.com or call Lejla Cenanovic at The Center (210) 616-0885.

Every Fourth Saturday:

10:00am-1:00pm

by Vicki Williams Patterson at The Ecumenical Center

Child Parent Relationship Training – also called Filial Therapy is a researched, 10-week parenting course for parents with children under the age of 10 that teaches parents how to use some of the same skills that play therapists use to help children experiencing social, emotional or behavioral problems.

FACILITATOR’S: Nancy Franklin, LCSW, ACSW, Registered Play Therapist and Supervisor and Julie Gowen, LCSW-S, Registered Play Therapist and Supervisor

CONTACT/REGISTER: Chelli Zey at (210)616-0885 or czey@ecrh.org

HOW CAN CPRT HELP?

In ten weeks, you will learn how to:

Regain control as a parent

Help your child develop self – control

Effectively discipline and limit inappropriate behavior

Understand your child’s emotional needs

Communicate more effectively with your child

In ten weeks, you will see a noticeable difference in:

Your relationship with your child

Your child’s behavior

Your ability to respond effectively

Your confidence in your parenting skills

 

 

 

19 July – flyer

 

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Open Art Studio Session. A wonderful opportunity for people of all ages (6-106) to use art materials in a playful manner in a relaxed setting.

To reserve a seat, please email Vlwpatrbc@gmail.com or call Lejla Cenanovic at The Center (210) 616-0885.

Every Fourth Saturday:

10:00am-1:00pm

Summary: Today’s school counselors, and other service providers for children, are being asked to do more and more with less and less. Even when the counseling load doesn’t increase, the intensity of just one child’s needs can be overwhelming. In this extended workshop, we will explore how to clear the space around ourselves and how to hold that space, despite forces around us descending into chaos and despair.

Objectives:

  1. Participants will engage in art tasks designed to “unload” the toxic stressors that invade their work with children.
  2. Participants will be introduced to the most powerful intervention available to them in their work.
  3. Participants will engage in a visualization task designed to discover what nourishes their identity as a counselor/caregiver.
  4. Participants will engage in art tasks designed to affirm and protect their efforts at self-care.

 

Vicki Williams-Patterson is a Board Certified Art Therapist and a Licensed Professional Counselor. She has worked as an art therapist since 1983. Her graduate education at Hahnemann University was strongly rooted in developmental psychology and psychodynamic theory, and she has continued with that orientation. Since 1990, she has been conducting seminars on the therapeutic uses of art in the counseling process at local, regional and national conferences.  Since receiving her graduate degree in Art Therapy, she has engaged in advanced professional training in the areas of trauma recovery, Jungian psychology, and Sand Tray Process. In November 2009 she received the American Art Therapy Association’s Annual Award for Clinical Services. She is the past President of the Texas Mental Health Counselors Association, a division of the Texas Counseling Association.

Join us for our 2018 Clergy Education Series, The American Religious Future, Is there one?

The Rev. Dr. Bill J. Leonard is the founding dean of the Wake Forest University School of Divinity in Winston-Salem, NC, and professor of church history and religion. He is an ordained Baptist minister, author/editor of 15 books and frequent lecturer.

Thursday, November 1, 2018

11:00 A.M. TO 1:30 PM

No cost – Lunch will be provided

RSVP by October 27 to LCENANOVIC@ECRH.ORG

(210)616-0885

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Open Art Studio Session. A wonderful opportunity for people of all ages (6-106) to use art materials in a playful manner in a relaxed setting.

To reserve a seat, please email Vlwpatrbc@gmail.com or call Lejla Cenanovic at The Center (210) 616-0885.

Every Fourth Saturday:

10:00am-1:00pm

at The Ecumenical Center

October 1st – November 5th

Join us at The Center for a no-cost, monthly Open Art Studio Session. A wonderful opportunity for people of all ages (6-106) to use art materials in a playful manner in a relaxed setting.

To reserve a seat, please email Vlwpatrbc@gmail.com or call Lejla Cenanovic at The Center (210) 616-0885.

Every Fourth Saturday:

10:00am-1:00pm

Multiple Events

Dr. Daniel J. Thompson

The Quantum Paradigm: A New Epoch and a New Ethic in Health Care

Lunch Seminar: 11:30 a.m. Lunch | Noon – 1:30 p.m. Seminar

The Ecumenical Center | 8310 Ewing Halsell | 210-616-0885

Dr. Ezekiel J. Emanuel

Legal and Ethical Considerations in Physician-Assisted Suicide

Evening Lecture:

6:00 p.m. Reception | 7:00-8:00 p.m. Lecture

UT Health San Antonio | Pestana Lecture Hall 3.104A7703 Floyd Curl Drive | 210-567-0795

 

Lunch Seminar:

Dr. Daniel Thompson, will speak on how practitioners’ own emotional and psychological health affects patients, which is often communicated to the patient transrationally and unconsciously.

Learning Objectives:

  • To understand the basic elements that set the quantum revolution in motion.
  • To understand the changing view of reality brought on by the quantum paradigm.
  • To understand how the new worldview expands and transcends our standard conceptualization of health and healthcare.
  • To understand how medical and mental health practitioners and their staffs have a systemic/group/milieu effect on patients that is much more powerful than previously understood.
  • To understand how practitioners’ own emotional and psychological health affects patients, which is often communicated to the patient transrationally and unconsciously.
  • To understand that patients’ emotional and mental lives have a more direct effect on physical conditions than we ever thought possible previously.

 

Evening Lecture:

Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel, will speak on the most common reasons patients request physician assisted suicide and the ethical concerns in physician decision making.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn precise definitions for terminology used in international discussions of physician-assisted suicide.
  • Be able to discuss the most common reasons patients request physician -assisted.
  • Be able to articulate several ethical concerns related to physician-assisted suicide and discuss whether these need additional research.